Author Topic: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.  (Read 25748 times)

Mr. T

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #150 on: Nov 02, 2012, 07:22:59 AM »
park the bike during the hot summer months in texas and ride in the ac lol

Spoken like a true Canadian.    ;D
Dude!!   Where have you been? 
 
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If we're not supposed to eat animals ... how come they're made out of meat?  ;D

Harley... the art of turning gas into noise without all that pesky horsepower.  ;D


bigjohn

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #151 on: Nov 13, 2012, 09:49:50 PM »
you can plan all you can..but i'd rather pray. Jesus is the one who looks out for some of us. all others[i mean really] should carry a gun or at least some mace. there are millions of desperate drug addicts lookin for out of towners.

gostr8r

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #152 on: Nov 14, 2012, 06:20:05 AM »
Agreed bigjohn. I would have packed my 9mm, but some places around the continent that will get me arrested so I opted not to. I did however take a weapons disarmament course, TLMís Fighting Chance Combat System, to take control of a thugs weapon, breakdown his foundation, vision and breathing and then use his own weapon on him if he somehow manages to get back up, blind, crippled and bleeding.  :crutch:
« Last Edit: Nov 14, 2012, 06:21:56 AM by gostr8r »
I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,   

bigjohn

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #153 on: Nov 17, 2012, 05:30:58 AM »
i have a question. i recently purchase a berger liner and gloves with the dual controller. the sales lady said to try them first before i bought the pants. do you feel that pants are ness. for 20 degree riding or long cold rides? big john

bigjohn

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #154 on: Nov 17, 2012, 05:36:17 AM »
i heard from a local gun nut that it is not illegal to carry an exposed handgun. is this true? and has anyone tried this? and what would be your opinion if you saw a biker with a gun?

gostr8r

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #155 on: Nov 17, 2012, 06:41:27 AM »
Unless you will be riding in those lower temps very Ďoften' then no they arenít really nessí. I opted for a heated seat and itís GREAT! It really only keeps the butt and upper legs, in the back, nice and toasty but that helps. The more often and the farther youíll go then the more it becomes a great way to go heaving the extra heated gear! I love my heated pant and jacket liners and they each give more muscle warmth than gloves do! I have ridden thousands of miles in freezing weather, but not very many with my heated gear tho. Thatís a relatively new thing for me. Point is I had always layered long johns, pants and sometimes chaps, and in extreme temps I put on my leather pants. For rides under 50/100 miles in freezing temps I will get by with just layering, but more than 100 miles can bring the body temp down enough to cause you to quiver, tremble, shake and become fatigued due to the constant muscle tension. Thatís when the leather pants came in handy. If it's 'several hundred miles' the heated gear is all GOOD! Also keep in mind that electric gloves only keep the hands Ďcomfortable', but not really very warm, where the pants actually will give the legs muscles some real warmth like the jacket liner will do that for the torso. I look forward to using mine again, and the only real downside is getting used to the wires, how to make all the connections and get at the controller with out being distracted. A few years ago we did a Christmas vacation in Salt Lake City, Utah and it was in the single digits or less each day. We hit a Burlington Coat Factory and each bought some great snow mobile suits, with jackets, pants, gloves and boots. We NEVER felt cold in that stuff at all! It was very fairly priced and much cheaper than the leather or heated gear. I wore it several times to work, round trip about 90 miles, when it was in the very low 30ís. It was very comfy and itís not heavy either. The fingers/hands and toes/feet, being the extremities, are usually going to be the hardest to keep warm. A heated seat and or the Hot Hands type heated packets that you can put in your pant and jacket pockets also will help you get home with less shivering. Keep the head warm and the wind from getting down your collar too and youíll be better off as well. Carrying a hand gun has a different effect on different folks. To the average person without any bad intentions, itís just an attention getter. To the thug that might want to challenge you in some way, it gets his attention too. It represents a free weapon that he can use on YOU, if he can get the jump on you and take control of it before you can react. He WILL be thinking of taking it from you too. Now he has a free gun! YOURS! If it is so secure that he canít get it from you then it's not much use in a split second reaction if he is within close quarters, cuz you wonít be able to pull it, unlock it and have a clean shot before he is all over you! He might play it smart and just follow you around till youíre alone, [maybe even at home and in bed] and then make his move. He already knows thereís a gun to be had where you go. IMO a weapon is best when kept as a secret and only revealed to an assailant that is unaware of what and who he is fíing with! The element of surprise is much more effective than reacting to someone that tries you because they want your gun. Once they take it from you what are you going to do? Run after them?   ???                                                                                                                                                                       
i have a question. i recently purchase a berger liner and gloves with the dual controller. the sales lady said to try them first before i bought the pants. do you feel that pants are ness. for 20 degree riding or long cold rides? big john
I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,   

gostr8r

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #156 on: Nov 17, 2012, 07:24:08 AM »
A biker with a gun Ďexposed' only makes me think he 'wants' to show it off and itís his way of saying ĎFEAR ME, I have a gun and I WILL USE THIS ON YOU IF YOU Fí WITH ME!í That doesnít impress me. In fact I donít see the holstered piece as a deterrent at all. It would impress me much more if he pulled it out of nowhere, and was still able to use it on the poor jack ass  ;D that challenged him but didnít know he had it  :yikes:. The days of people being attacked by punches and kicks are all but over. Now itís almost always some kind of weapon and the punks out there want a weapon to do their dirty deeds using it for maximum intimidation. Showing your weapon only gives that hardened street smart thug some food for thought on how heís going to take you down  :thinking: and get the gun from you. If he doesnít see one he looks for someone that else that does and waits for his chance. Or seeks a weak looking victim that wonít be able to defend themselves effectively.
I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,   

bigjohn

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #157 on: Nov 20, 2012, 05:22:10 PM »
tried putting my gas cap on the grip and front brake...and it works...no more leaving my cap rollin around on the top of a dirty gas pump...thanks 250,000 mile man...big john

gostr8r

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #158 on: Nov 21, 2012, 06:51:16 AM »
It does work well, and if the bars get turned just a bit to the left, as you roll that last foot up to the pump, it's a bit more stable on that little perched resting spot up there too ;).
I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,   

gostr8r

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #159 on: Nov 21, 2012, 06:56:09 AM »
Always keep a set of daytime  8) and night time riding glasses  :o when out and about on the road. I work nights now and once in a while I donít get home until after the sun comes up. I end up being blinded by the morning glare coming from the east as I head home from the project I am currently on. Still learning to remember the things that I had already learned when I was much younger and less forgetful.
I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,   

sasharaider

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #160 on: May 17, 2013, 10:31:37 AM »
Prep and packing are obviously related to where [away from civilization and gas, unfamiliar roads, etc], how far and  when you go [climate extremes] and if you ride alone or 2 up. For this post I wanted to cover 2 up cross country journey's. I obviously spent the money on the Corbin touring kit and a T bag, so use what use can of this and disregard the rest of my rant. In the planning stages seek feedback from others that have gone before you to the same places and in the same season. Take the 'common goods ands bad points' that they all give and apply them accordingly. Call or search online for up to date road conditions such as closures and repairs. Have your sled serviced, use lock tight on the fasteners and start with good rubber! Notify the bank or credit card companies so they don't refuse your purchases or embarrass you at a gas station. Carry a gas can unless your sure of the stops and supply. Let a friend know of your ETA's each day by phone, just in the extreme case you leave the rode and end up in a ditch or someplace that isn't visible from the highway. Minimize night riding, or at least wear highly reflective vests. Weather permitting, get early starts, and experience high altitude sunrises and sunsets. Take advantage of National Park Passes, frequent flier miles and motel promos. Consider a LoJack or some anti theft equipment. Check your tires, axle nuts, lights and luggage stability regularly. Cruise controls, hi-way pegs, back support and free ballin' body powders are a must for the long rides. Keep your eyes well protected and moving back and forth across the road [stop or let the passenger do the picture taking] and ride like you're invisible [figure that they don't see you at all]. Stay way back from, or ahead of the big rigs to avoid running the reds lights behind them and also to avoid their recaps and rock slinging at your face. Stay within 10 mph of the postedlimits, Kojack and his Kodack love tourists! Hydrate, stretch and snack at gas stops. Use 'both' hand and electric turn signals. Cover the longest distances early on and gradually get shorter for a couple days before going long again. Get business or post cards from the places that you would recommend to others. Meet and greet the locals and patronize their diners. Promote the Raider Rally and the RSR Forum with drop cards and reach out to your other members on the road. Take road sign photos of obscure turns into great places, and make a nightly video diary, all to help you stay focused on what you did, how you felt and how you got there. When you get stressed out or upset remember that you could also be unemployed, homeless and on foot, but instead your in the wind on a Raider! Now for packing, I have some suggestions too. Remember your docs', DL, AAA, AARP, credit cards that say check ID [also carry an expired one to give the thug that robs you at gun point], plus insurance and registration cards. Both of you have cell phones at all times. Take a tank bag or at least a mid size gym bag, or book bag,for the passengers lap. Here I pack the easy access items: a kick stand plate, camera batteries, snacks, water, sunblock, chap stick, bug spray, maps, hand towel [for a wet seat], sani-wipes or hand gel, RSR drop cards and a pen, octane booster, flashlight, scarfs, gloves, glasses, camera batteries, a multi-tool and even a roll of toilet paper! Under a bungie net I keep rain suits [which can be used in place of bulkier jackets and chaps], Spider Feet [for the boots] and either a half bike cover or a large contractors clean up bag to cover the luggage in the rain. In a removable pack [for hauling into the motel room] I have the clothes [4 pair of socks, 3 t-shirts at the most, a dress shirt, 2 jeans, her pj's, flip flops, walking shoes, bathing suit, and do laundry on the 4th day] plus your med's and vitamins, all the chargers, USB and AVI cables, make-up and shave kits. On the bike I keep the tool kit bagged up with offset screw drivers, a small set of allen's, combo wrenches and 3/8th drive sockets, knife, retractable mechanical fingers, mirror and magnet, electrical needle nose and vise grip pliers and a wide jaw 6" crescent. In a repair bag kit I have a small assortment of zip ties, fuses, bulbs, connectors, hose clamps, a lighter and shrink tube, Locktite, a spark plug, tire repair kit and a DC operated mini air compressor or Fix-a-flat, plus teflon, electrical and duct tapes. and lastly I have a cleaning kit with bronze wool, ammonia free windex [closed up], micro fiber clothes, a good paste wax, cotton gloves, hand wipes and best of all the throw away black cotton rags from my Harley shirts after I cut off the inked in areas. I know this is along read, but if it helps any one at all pass it on.
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me. Has that happened to you previously?

Man it sounds like you've traveled cross the country 10x :p  O8O

Ares X

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #161 on: May 17, 2013, 11:12:19 AM »
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.

MYRDR

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #162 on: May 17, 2013, 11:14:20 AM »
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.

Just hope the thief doesn't look at it closely...  :yikes:

Ares X

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #163 on: May 17, 2013, 11:19:57 AM »
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.

Just hope the thief doesn't look at it closely...  :yikes:

I can't imagine they're going to hang out that long. Plus if they're staring at the card to determine if it's real, you take that moment to club them over the head with something. Or if you'tre carrying (which I don't), pull out your firearm.

Sweet Tooth

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Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« Reply #164 on: May 17, 2013, 12:05:37 PM »
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.

Just hope the thief doesn't look at it closely...  :yikes:

I can't imagine they're going to hang out that long. Plus if they're staring at the card to determine if it's real, you take that moment to club them over the head with something. Or if you'tre carrying (which I don't), pull out your firearm.
:agree: ;D ;D
Some prefer medicine. I prefer my Raider.