Yamaha Road Star Raider Motorcycle Forum

Raider Categories => General Raider Discussion => Topic started by: gostr8r on Mar 09, 2010, 09:36:50 pm

Title: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 09, 2010, 09:36:50 pm
here ya go. I spent 2 hours writing this and added 2 photos and then it wouldn't posts.  :witsend: I'll try again tomorrow.
Title: Re: Long distance riding tips.
Post by: gman on Mar 09, 2010, 10:35:35 pm
That has happened to me too, real bummer.
Title: Re: Long distance riding tips.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 09, 2010, 10:40:19 pm
here ya go. I spent 2 hours writing this and added 2 photos and then it wouldn't posts.  :witsend: I'll try again tomorrow.

What a bummer!! :'(
Title: Re: Long distance riding tips.
Post by: seventhLetter on Mar 09, 2010, 10:47:59 pm
Sorry about that Ray. Looking forward to your tips brother!
Title: Re: Long distance riding tips.
Post by: LostDog on Mar 09, 2010, 11:19:42 pm
Man, I can relate to that chit!
Title: Re: Long distance riding tips.
Post by: EraserX33 on Mar 10, 2010, 12:11:20 am
Whenever I'm writing a long post (rarely if ever) I tend to write it in MS Word and then copy and paste it in.  It viods that problem.  Plus you can save it and come back to it later if you need to.

Looking forward to reading your tips Ray.

Title: Re: Long distance riding tips.
Post by: LostDog on Mar 10, 2010, 01:59:23 am
When I think of it  :rolleyes:, I copy it to my clipboard then try to post (or send if it's an email). If anything goes wrong I can just open another and paste it and try again.
Title: Re: Long distance riding tips.
Post by: Rick Busbea on Mar 10, 2010, 02:16:17 am
Definitely looking forward to the tips gostr8r. I'm making a trip from LA to KC mid-June and am looking for all the advice I can get. cornfed made up a nice packing list, but am always looking for more input.  :raider:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 04:44:39 am
Prep and packing are obviously related to where [away from civilization and gas, unfamiliar roads, etc], how far and  when you go [climate extremes] and if you ride alone or 2 up. For this post I wanted to cover 2 up cross country journey's. I obviously spent the money on the Corbin touring kit and a T bag, so use what use can of this and disregard the rest of my rant. In the planning stages seek feedback from others that have gone before you to the same places and in the same season. Take the 'common goods ands bad points' that they all give and apply them accordingly. Call or search online for up to date road conditions such as closures and repairs. Have your sled serviced, use lock tight on the fasteners and start with good rubber! Notify the bank or credit card companies so they don't refuse your purchases or embarrass you at a gas station. Carry a gas can unless your sure of the stops and supply. Let a friend know of your ETA's each day by phone, just in the extreme case you leave the rode and end up in a ditch or someplace that isn't visible from the highway. Minimize night riding, or at least wear highly reflective vests. Weather permitting, get early starts, and experience high altitude sunrises and sunsets. Take advantage of National Park Passes, frequent flier miles and motel promos. Consider a LoJack or some anti theft equipment. Check your tires, axle nuts, lights and luggage stability regularly. Cruise controls, hi-way pegs, back support and free ballin' body powders are a must for the long rides. Keep your eyes well protected and moving back and forth across the road [stop or let the passenger do the picture taking] and ride like you're invisible [figure that they don't see you at all]. Stay way back from, or ahead of the big rigs to avoid running the reds lights behind them and also to avoid their recaps and rock slinging at your face. Stay within 10 mph of the postedlimits, Kojack and his Kodack love tourists! Hydrate, stretch and snack at gas stops. Use 'both' hand and electric turn signals. Cover the longest distances early on and gradually get shorter for a couple days before going long again. Get business or post cards from the places that you would recommend to others. Meet and greet the locals and patronize their diners. Promote the Raider Rally and the RSR Forum with drop cards and reach out to your other members on the road. Take road sign photos of obscure turns into great places, and make a nightly video diary, all to help you stay focused on what you did, how you felt and how you got there. When you get stressed out or upset remember that you could also be unemployed, homeless and on foot, but instead your in the wind on a Raider! Now for packing, I have some suggestions too. Remember your docs', DL, AAA, AARP, credit cards that say check ID [also carry an expired one to give the thug that robs you at gun point], plus insurance and registration cards. Both of you have cell phones at all times. Take a tank bag or at least a mid size gym bag, or book bag,for the passengers lap. Here I pack the easy access items: a kick stand plate, camera batteries, snacks, water, sunblock, chap stick, bug spray, maps, hand towel [for a wet seat], sani-wipes or hand gel, RSR drop cards and a pen, octane booster, flashlight, scarfs, gloves, glasses, camera batteries, a multi-tool and even a roll of toilet paper! Under a bungie net I keep rain suits [which can be used in place of bulkier jackets and chaps], Spider Feet [for the boots] and either a half bike cover or a large contractors clean up bag to cover the luggage in the rain. In a removable pack [for hauling into the motel room] I have the clothes [4 pair of socks, 3 t-shirts at the most, a dress shirt, 2 jeans, her pj's, flip flops, walking shoes, bathing suit, and do laundry on the 4th day] plus your med's and vitamins, all the chargers, USB and AVI cables, make-up and shave kits. On the bike I keep the tool kit bagged up with offset screw drivers, a small set of allen's, combo wrenches and 3/8th drive sockets, knife, retractable mechanical fingers, mirror and magnet, electrical needle nose and vise grip pliers and a wide jaw 6" crescent. In a repair bag kit I have a small assortment of zip ties, fuses, bulbs, connectors, hose clamps, a lighter and shrink tube, Locktite, a spark plug, tire repair kit and a DC operated mini air compressor or Fix-a-flat, plus teflon, electrical and duct tapes. and lastly I have a cleaning kit with bronze wool, ammonia free windex [closed up], micro fiber clothes, a good paste wax, cotton gloves, hand wipes and best of all the throw away black cotton rags from my Harley shirts after I cut off the inked in areas. I know this is along read, but if it helps any one at all pass it on.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dreadly on Mar 10, 2010, 06:48:18 am
From someone that has ridden as many miles as you, it's golden advise!

All of it good. The one thing I would probably never have thought of is the octane boost, and I can see where it would come in handy. Even here last year on a ride, I had to put in $5 of regular to get me to the next 'real' gas station.

Thanks Ray
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Mar 10, 2010, 08:23:21 am
Some great advice... thanks.  I'm sure I'll be looking this up again prior to my iron butt ride to see the shuttle launch.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Defender Bob on Mar 10, 2010, 08:40:07 am
Thats some great info!

On a side note, 250,000 miles is a $hit load of miles!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on Mar 10, 2010, 11:21:38 am
Thanks gostr8r, some good info in here, along with stuff I didn't even consider. Great help for my upcoming 4K trip!!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 10, 2010, 11:40:31 am
Thanx Ray!!! You will have made a difference in a lot of members travels, this year, and into the future. I will be using this list for my June California trip. It will be very cool when you get here in July, and to see it first hand. Probably see how I should have packed properly.  ;D ;D ;D Thanx again, my FRIEND!


RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 05:07:41 pm
I would have added more info but Kim was harassing me to call it a night. I have a lot more and as a rider I evolve and learn from others too. I've learned a great deal reading posts by our other members like TRaiderJohn, and many others that are so technically sharp and well read. I'll share what I've learned and some of that is from my friends! Got a few honey do's tonight so maybe I'll add some more stuff tomorrow.
Thanx Ray!!! You will have made a difference in a lot of members travels, this year, and into the future. I will be using this list for my June California trip. It will be very cool when you get here in July, and to see it first hand. Probably see how I should have packed properly.  ;D ;D ;D Thanx again, my FRIEND!


RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 05:11:57 pm
Get your witness doc's signed, as often as possible with the odo' readings, time, place, and who your witness was at each stop. No credit without the signatures. It takes a little convincing that they're not on the hook for some costs or liability. Look me up when you come across here cuz I'm almost in your route, stay with Kim and I. I'm pinned on the members map for you to see our location. quote author=Mr. T link=topic=4329.msg83137#msg83137 date=1268231001]
Some great advice... thanks.  I'm sure I'll be looking this up again prior to my iron butt ride to see the shuttle launch.
[/quote]
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RaiderTN on Mar 10, 2010, 05:17:37 pm
great stuff gostr8r, especially for guys like me with hardly any miles under em... especially compared to 250,000
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 05:20:34 pm
Space permitting, you might also pack a container of injector cleaner. I got gas at Kennedy Space Center twice and both times it clogged up my injectors. The cleaner from Walmart cleared it up tho. It's not so much the brand you buy, as it is the high sale volumes on the pumps to keep the underground fuel fresh and not stale. Avoid the stations that do little business if you can, even if the price is lower. It could cause you the same glitch I had. Shame on me for doing it twice!
From someone that has ridden as many miles as you, it's golden advise!

All of it good. The one thing I would probably never have thought of is the octane boost, and I can see where it would come in handy. Even here last year on a ride, I had to put in $5 of regular to get me to the next 'real' gas station.

Thanks Ray
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 05:22:54 pm
The great thing about this forum is the help you'll get from some of the most active members. It only promotes good will among the brothers and sisters here and spills over on to the streets if we're really unselfish. Pass it on my friend!
great stuff gostr8r, especially for guys like me with hardly any miles under em... especially compared to 250,000
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MYWORLD on Mar 10, 2010, 05:35:06 pm
I cant wait to meet up this summer!!!! Problem is will be tough to let ya get to your next stop I'll want to pick your brain like crazy!!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 05:43:05 pm
Help, I'm talking and I can't shut up! That's a warning MYWORLD. Cranes and M/C's are endless subjects of discussion for me. We'll get as much in as chat as possible and maybe some riding too to see your great town and roads. quote author=MYWORLD link=topic=4329.msg83390#msg83390 date=1268264106]
I cant wait to meet up this summer!!!! Problem is will be tough to let ya get to your next stop I'll want to pick your brain like crazy!!!
[/quote]
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MYWORLD on Mar 10, 2010, 05:45:04 pm
Help, I'm talking and I can't shut up! That's a warning MYWORLD. Cranes and M/C's are endless subjects of discussion for me. We'll get as much in as chat as possible and maybe some riding too to see your great town and roads. quote author=MYWORLD link=topic=4329.msg83390#msg83390 date=1268264106]
I cant wait to meet up this summer!!!! Problem is will be tough to let ya get to your next stop I'll want to pick your brain like crazy!!!
[/quote]
I'm looking forward to it!!! Wifey gonna be to Prego by then to rid ewith me anymore so I cant wait for some season veteran lessons from ya!!! LOL
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 05:51:25 pm
Excellent, and congrats on the newbie too! 
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MYWORLD on Mar 10, 2010, 05:51:47 pm
Excellent, and congrats on the newbie too! 
Thank you sir!!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 06:54:12 pm
I can't take credit for all this stuff but will share it. I had made laminated maps of each day's ride on a separate sheet with written turn by turns, and distances on the opposite sides. I got a folder with a clear cover and had Kim keep me up to date as we rode along. She would change out the map every day accordingly and it was always right there on her lap in the book bag. I use a fuel bung to top off so I don't get the back splashes. If I calculate the amount close enough and pay cash the pumps slows down for the last 50 cents too. I also put the gas cap on the right grip between the throttle and the brake lever so it doesn't fall off and get scratched or contaminated. It's a good tight fit up there. I'll turn the wheel fully left just before it stops rolling to avoid the grinding of the tire tread in one spot each time and to make room for the nozzle. On the full left turn thought , Do something to remind your self not to pull away from a parked spot with the forks locked! It's a no brainer, but many seasoned riders have made the same dumb move, me included, and paid the price for it. Leather saddle bags are over rated. I had Willie Max bags for 10 years and they still looked better than any leather ones after their 1st year! You can wash the PVC bags. Key trinkets and gadgets that touch the chrome switch cover will scratch it up eventually, and you'll be sorry you didn't just keep a single key on a small ring. Same with the popular fork bags on bikes with OEM length tubes. They do scuff and mark up the fender paint unless you take measures with some soft material to protect it. It's a subtle but sure scraping and rubbing of your clear coat. If you have ass length hair I recommend you keep it tucked in the back of your shirt. 2 reasons, first it doesn't fray and end up like a barrel cleaner from whipping around and secondly wifey can't use it as a rev limiter when you want to have a little freshly well done smoked HOG. I'm a big fan of heated garments now that I've tried them. If that's too pricey then layered outfits top and bottom help and the hot pockets on the inside pockets of your jackets and in the boots help some too. Kim keeps here's in her mittens for at least 12 hours. She has a blue tongue and no circulation at all. My little frozen Butter Ball Turkey! A rain suit blocks some of the cold air and can save you some packing space in a pinch. Ear plugs help in the cold if you ride with a half lid or none at all. I have some spring loaded ear muffs that will stay on too but my fav is the lined and quilted aviators cap that covers the whole head, sides of the face and forehead too. I also use a lined face mask. In a pinch on the side of the road you can jack your bike up off the ground. I get something to put under the right side of the frame as I push the bike hard over against the kick stand, then go around to the left side and repeat the process with the same amount of wood or a covered brick as you push the bike hard over to the exhaust side. When you let it go the bike will be elevated enough to spin a wheel. Once in desperation I backed over a curb to bottom out my Pan head, so I could rebuild the wheel cylinder on the side of the road. It was 25 degrees and I still had 500 miles to go with a broken left foot. It was 19 degrees when i rolled in at the AF Base at 3 am. Help another rider that's down on the side of the road! I met most of my friends for the first 22 years when I was broke down with my HD's. It helped me become more effective at repairs but met some cool people too. Do something on your ride to help others any way. I'm ashamed that I haven't stepped up earlier in a Pennies Of Passion type effort on my other 6 trips. The traveling flag is a start that will grow and touch the lives of many and who knows what will come from that. Plan for a new rear tire on a ride of more that 8K or so. The roads surfaces, temps, speeds and hard mountain carving and starts and stops take they're toll early. Take a small assortment of inexpensive gifts for some of the brothers that you'll meet on the road. That could be our RSR drop cards, a tiny piece of something that he can use, like an O ring or cap to a swing arm axle nut from a quart of Amzoil. It dates the moment and helps you remember each other's meeting for the 1st time. I keep a long skinny feather duster in the bags to brush off the dust that settles everyday at work and where ever. It really helps.  More to came later my friends!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: soto on Mar 10, 2010, 07:00:35 pm
wow gostr8r had alot to say huh
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 10, 2010, 07:02:36 pm
Hey Ray,
Copy, paste, print!!! Thanx Bro. Have you thought about writing a book?

Did you get a chance to look at "Chuckanut Drive" yet?


RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RaiderTN on Mar 10, 2010, 07:08:32 pm
more great stuff! hey gostr8r, any tips on the difference or what to expect when transitioning from single to two up riding?
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on Mar 10, 2010, 07:17:36 pm
can we sticky this.....I read all of that and would love
it to be readily available...please!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RaiderTN on Mar 10, 2010, 07:28:43 pm
 :agree: I'd second that...
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on Mar 10, 2010, 07:36:52 pm
I didnt see your advice on racing motorcycle gangs ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 07:38:31 pm
What's a sticky?
can we sticky this.....I read all of that and would love
it to be readily available...please!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 07:43:54 pm
Don't end up as a rear bumper ornament trying to stretch out the already ridiculous lead that your Raider will have. And twice is enough to get the point across. Don't flip them off as you blow past 'em like they're parked. They'll  remember which bike made thiers look like the wimps and posers that they were.
I didnt see your advice on racing motorcycle gangs ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Defender Bob on Mar 10, 2010, 07:45:05 pm
What's a sticky?
can we sticky this.....I read all of that and would love
it to be readily available...please!!

A sticky is a topic that the Moderators can have always appear up top and in bold.  It basically remains "stuck" on top of all the other topics.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Defender Bob on Mar 10, 2010, 07:54:32 pm
Man I love all of this info.  Seems like you have done it all and seen it all on the road.  I will definitely be using this thread before I make my Canada trip in June
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 08:18:47 pm
Riding 2 up is an investment in your relationship and the good times you will have together. Kim has 23 states and Canada now on the buddy seat and still begs to go for more, but again it's an investment! Kim immediately got a huge hog bite on her calf from looking at her hair in the mirror while standing a little too close to the pipes. It was blister the size of a golf ball in 10 minutes and took 3 years for the scar to go away. She suggests you something to break the wind from her pretty face. A good wind shield or fairing. It takes time to look as good as they do and then we go and screw it all up with all the wind tunnel effects. She gets a different buffeting than you do being back and a bit higher in the saddle. Get her a helmet, glasses [stylish of course] and riding gear that she really likes, to make her want show it off. When she has to go, find a place right away. That way when you do and she doesn't she'll get over it. Make sure she doesn't move her weight left or right while on the bike, even if you're at a light. Don't ever let her get on or off unless she lets you know so you're ready to keep the bike balanced. I lean way forward to let her know I'm ready and it gives her a lot more room to step over without kicking my Corbin bags. Let her pick some of the destinations, diners, stops and rests areas to keep her as much a part of the team as possible and keep her motivation for riding two up higher. Suggest more warm clothes if in doubt and take the initiative to pack her a set of gloves or a scarf in case the cold moves in on you at night. On really long ride jaunts allow her to put her legs around you and rest her boots on your legs to give her tush a break. Have her sit as straight up as possible at times too also to give certain muscle groups and bun areas a break. Ask her to massage your shoulders once in a while. Even if you don't need it a it's a nice gesture and bonding experience. Do the same for her legs too. My cruise control allows my to get both sides on the open road. Ride the longer portions of your trip first and gradually get shorter as the journey progresses so she doesn't resent the ride. If she gets a second wind then go long again. Don't hit the Raider's throttle hard and suddenly unless she knows ahead of time. Wifey almost flew off the back when the back rest collapsed. She doesn't mind if she can brace for it. She's out in the hot tube so I'll close for now!!!!!
more great stuff! hey gostr8r, any tips on the difference or what to expect when transitioning from single to two up riding?
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Girt on Mar 10, 2010, 08:30:33 pm
Great info Ray! Thanks for sharing all this with us!! :goodjob:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 09:01:39 pm
It's my pleasure, and I'll add more in time. Others have helped me too and so I'll pay it forward. Dawn and Phil have been great friends and I learn a lot from both of them, even tho I have a lot more years and miles in the saddle. I actually learned more from my Mom than anyone, because of her practical nature. I apply the way of looking at things and being prepared from seeing her deal with stuff all the time. She's usually my first or last stop on the trips. A great meal, good times and excellent advice always. Now if I could only get her on the bike! NOT!!!!!!!! She'll go to her grave without ever experiencing that. Scared $htless!.  quote author=Girt link=topic=4329.msg83527#msg83527 date=1268274633]
Great info Ray! Thanks for sharing all this with us!! :goodjob:
[/quote]
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: NorthTxRaider on Mar 10, 2010, 09:14:06 pm
Great information, Ray. A lot of that I do already on long hauls... but definitely picked up a few excellent tips. I also like the idea of a video diary... that will allow you to look at yourself and see how you are faring through the ride.
Prep and packing are obviously related to where ...
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: JazzyzGurl on Mar 10, 2010, 09:18:02 pm
Wow - lots of great information and tips!  Thanks for sharing with us!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 10, 2010, 09:25:38 pm
Welcome all of you! Another thing to consider is a balance between seeing a lot of great stuff in depth or covering a lot of miles. I could go much further this summer but choose to spend a little extra time with my new friends on this great forum. A total of 6 days extra in fact. I won't regret a minute of it either! I can get back to see more of the earth at another time, but this is an opportunity of a lifetime to meet these great hosts.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 10, 2010, 10:43:07 pm
Welcome all of you! Another thing to consider is a balance between seeing a lot of great stuff in depth or covering a lot of miles. I could go much further this summer but choose to spend a little extra time with my new friends on this great forum. A total of 6 days extra in fact. I won't regret a minute of it either! I can get back to see more of the earth at another time, but this is an opportunity of a lifetime to meet these great hosts.
I'm looking forward to it brother! Your tips are so welcome too. I am learning stuff I can do for my wife now, from this, on some of our local rides.


RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 11, 2010, 05:11:35 am
On my lesser torquey Warrior I made a u turn and then grabbed a bunch of the throttle to make up for lost ground in our group. I found myself riding a 15 foot wheelie with Kim being the rear end ballast that allowed the front to be relatively light under the hard xl and also making the rear tire less likely to break loose. I'm just saying......! She had my long red braided rev limiter in full force on that one. :D :D
more great stuff! hey gostr8r, any tips on the difference or what to expect when transitioning from single to two up riding?
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on Mar 11, 2010, 05:58:22 am
sticky sticky sticky pleeeeeeeeeease!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Mar 11, 2010, 07:20:08 am
sticky sticky sticky pleeeeeeeeeease!


Sticky it is.......
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 11, 2010, 03:47:52 pm
DO NOT, I repeat do not poke along on the right or left rear corner of any vehicle in a lane next to yours. That's just bad form and WILL lead to getting cut off, as your in their blind spot. More importantly tho, is that you don't do that in the rain. I was 9,035 miles into a 9,043 mile journey, back from the west coast, on a very wet road. A darn big ass Tahoe came around me just as he reached a flooded area in his lane that was over a 100' long. I was almost knocked off the bike by the massive wave from his rooster tail as he slowly passed me. Took it full force in the chest and face like a fire hose. Thought it was never gonna stop and feared for my life for a few terrifying seconds. 8 miles from home and nearly drowned riding a m/c! Whodathunkit! :o
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 11, 2010, 03:54:05 pm
I'll give credit to my brothers and sisters on our forum here for the cool tips they gave me about the Netbooks, and apps for cell phones that can track and record your movements. That's all way cool stuff and I will be getting the Toshiba or Asus Netbook. When the money tree starts to bloom and I can afford a $30 a month increase in my cellular bill, for the app required on new phone, I'm getting that one too. My son has it and loves it.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 11, 2010, 08:28:13 pm
We have the best model of an air cooled, push rod actuated, belt driven, V twin bad ass looking torque monster on the market! :ohyeah: :ohyeah:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gman on Mar 11, 2010, 08:56:04 pm
If you got more to say I'm still reading. Thanks for the info.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 11, 2010, 08:58:05 pm
We have the best model of an air cooled, push rod actuated, belt driven, V twin bad ass looking torque monster on the market! :ohyeah: :ohyeah:
Tell us how ya REALLY feel!!!  ;D

RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MYWORLD on Mar 11, 2010, 08:58:48 pm
We have the best model of an air cooled, push rod actuated, belt driven, V twin bad ass looking torque monster on the market! :ohyeah: :ohyeah:

FO SHO!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 11, 2010, 09:24:47 pm
Ok I held back a little on the Raider kudos. You' all hear it and sing it so much anyhow. Also
I just realized that the bronze wool I use so much is from a company called Homax Products, Inc.
 in Bellingham. It's called Rhodes American Bronze wool, finish grade.
We have the best model of an air cooled, push rod actuated, belt driven, V twin bad ass looking torque monster on the market! :ohyeah: :ohyeah:
Tell us how ya REALLY feel!!!  ;D

RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 11, 2010, 09:27:02 pm
I just realized that the bronze wool I use so much is from a company called Homax Products, Inc.
 in Bellingham. It's called Rhodes American Bronze wool, finish grade.
We have the best model of an air cooled, push rod actuated, belt driven, V twin bad ass looking torque monster on the market! :ohyeah: :ohyeah:
Tell us how ya REALLY feel!!!  ;D

RSR
Wanna pay them a visit? It's fine by me.  :raider: :raider:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MYWORLD on Mar 11, 2010, 09:32:03 pm
I just realized that the bronze wool I use so much is from a company called Homax Products, Inc.
 in Bellingham. It's called Rhodes American Bronze wool, finish grade.
We have the best model of an air cooled, push rod actuated, belt driven, V twin bad ass looking torque monster on the market! :ohyeah: :ohyeah:
Tell us how ya REALLY feel!!!  ;D

RSR
Wanna pay them a visit? It's fine by me.  :raider: :raider:
LOL
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 11, 2010, 09:40:49 pm
No don't really want to visit 'em, just letting you know they're so close to home.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MYWORLD on Mar 11, 2010, 09:41:22 pm
No don't really want to visit 'em, just letting you know they're so close to home.
LOL
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: trimblejet on Mar 13, 2010, 07:39:50 pm
great write up! ileave in july for L.A, woul ???d have never thought about a simple fuse.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 13, 2010, 07:43:13 pm
He has thought of a lot of little things.

RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 13, 2010, 08:10:16 pm
If you're out there alone and need one then you'll only leave home without it once. I have resorted to unwrapping a stick chewing gum and putting the foil around the bad fuse to get me home. The Raider comes with an extra fuse or 2 of the newer kind in the little black plastic fuse box tho. Check the amp requirements for the application first. Over or under by too much is not helpful.   quote author=trimblejet link=topic=4329.msg84705#msg84705 date=1268530790]
great write up! ileave in july for L.A, woul ???d have never thought about a simple fuse.
[/quote]
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 13, 2010, 11:57:11 pm
No don't really want to visit 'em, just letting you know they're so close to home.
Why thank you Ray.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Motodad393 on Mar 15, 2010, 01:39:34 pm
Cool post with some good info.  I have been riding for 40+ years, mostly off-road and recently went for it and bought my Raider S. 

For me living in a big city - Houston, TX I try NEVER to ride in a blind spot and I accelerate through them as I come upon them.  Going through the city a rider must be aggressive, alert and aware of who is behind them.  I ride a bit faster than the flow of traffic to "stay ahead" and try and leave myself an out.  If this is not possible, I follow way behind, or take another route.  Fortunately, the Raider can "get around" rather nicely by using the twist of the right wrist - as needed.

I usually use the bright light riding in the city and on roads with uncontrolled egress.  I remain amazed at how many car drivers just fail to see bikes.  The number of incompetent drivers amazes me.

Ride Safe All!   :raider: 
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 15, 2010, 05:49:55 pm
You got that right! Not 1 but 3 of my friends were badly injured last week coming home from Daytona. In each case an oncoming car turned left right directly in front of their bikes, and they all hit the passenger side of the cars to avoid the face plant in the windshield scenario. Nordicsoul is in therapy now with enough titanium hardware in his right side to make a small bike. They think he won't walk for 3 months. Then he'll get a new raider to replace the totaled one. These wake up calls come so often and so close to home too. Let's all heed the warnings brothers and sisters!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 15, 2010, 05:51:16 pm
Just the kinda smbch I am. :D
No don't really want to visit 'em, just letting you know they're so close to home.
Why thank you Ray.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on Mar 15, 2010, 06:46:21 pm
I hear ya Ray...it is sad and disturbing but I will be thinking
of them.....mostly digger cuz he is the only one I know and
the only other silver we ride with... :(
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MYWORLD on Mar 15, 2010, 07:25:38 pm
You got that right! Not 1 but 3 of my friends were badly injured last week coming home from Daytona. In each case an oncoming car turned left right directly in front of their bikes, and they all hit the passenger side of the cars to avoid the face plant in the windshield scenario. Nordicsoul is in therapy now with enough titanium hardware in his right side to make a small bike. They think he won't walk for 3 months. Then he'll get a new raider to replace the totaled one. These wake up calls come so often and so close to home too. Let's all heed the warnings brothers and sisters!
I wish em my best!!!!!!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Defender Bob on Mar 15, 2010, 08:02:19 pm
You got that right! Not 1 but 3 of my friends were badly injured last week coming home from Daytona. In each case an oncoming car turned left right directly in front of their bikes, and they all hit the passenger side of the cars to avoid the face plant in the windshield scenario. Nordicsoul is in therapy now with enough titanium hardware in his right side to make a small bike. They think he won't walk for 3 months. Then he'll get a new raider to replace the totaled one. These wake up calls come so often and so close to home too. Let's all heed the warnings brothers and sisters!

Man that definitely sucks!  Those cagers need to watch out!  I will keep them in my thoughts and prayers.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 15, 2010, 08:19:30 pm
Thanks folks, on his behalf, and he would appreciate it too. I've been hit twice in 30 years and still have all my limbs pointing in the direction that they're supposed to point. LOL. I think I've mellowed some on the road compared to 10 years ago when I left the dark side [HD's] and finally got a bike that would outrun a pedestrian LOL!. I went apes nuts and raced anyone that tickled their throttles in my presence.  Got to be more selective as time went on and my bikes got faster. Hope to make it till I'm so old that there's no place on the continent that I haven't ridden to. And do more Pennies of Passion Rides each summer from a different exotic place back to the Rally. I'm soooo stoked and ready for it to happen this year!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Cruiser on Mar 15, 2010, 09:00:20 pm
Ray I am sorry to hear about your friend. My prayers for him too.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 15, 2010, 09:32:12 pm
Thanks folks, on his behalf, and he would appreciate it too. I've been hit twice in 30 years and still have all my limbs pointing in the direction that they're supposed to point. LOL. I think I've mellowed some on the road compared to 10 years ago when I left the dark side [HD's] and finally got a bike that would outrun a pedestrian LOL!. I went apes nuts and raced anyone that tickled their throttles in my presence.  Got to be more selective as time went on and my bikes got faster. Hope to make it till I'm so old that there's no place on the continent that I haven't ridden to. And do more Pennies of Passion Rides each summer from a different exotic place back to the Rally. I'm soooo stoked and ready for it to happen this year!
Were ready to have it happen too!!!

Sorry about your friends, will keep them in my prayers tonight.

RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 19, 2010, 05:31:31 pm
I hate to admit it but I got bit by the same act of stupidity twice in just 3 weeks. What did I learn? That just because you put something in your saddle bags doesn't meant it's secure or ok. During the Rat's Hole Custom Bike Show I put my nerd cam in the left bag but evidently put something on top of it a with a little too much pressure. Later that night riding back to camp getting some real good vid's behind my friends on their oil spewing Knuckleheads, the camera mount just broke in half and the video camera flew off the bike at 60mph. A total loss and the card was gone too. Well last night, leaving another bike show, I was packing my 1st Place Trophy Plaque in the same bag while talking to some droolers. I didn't notice that my leftover Jim's Dirty Taters were on top, in a bag and laying on they're side leaking all the delicious oil and sauce onto the plaque and adhesives that held the ornaments and inscriptions on it. Rode home in a light rain, grabbed the plaque in the dark garage and brought in to show Kim. I noticed that the entire top portion of the plaque [the Eagles head and US Flag and Banner] was out of place, so I tried to pry up on the corner to loosen the adhesive to reposition it, and it actually POPPED off suddenly. It flew across the kitchen counter and hit the tile floor in a dozen pieces. My good mood changed very fast! :'(
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 19, 2010, 05:43:27 pm
Dam the luck Bro!! That will put your ego in check in a hurry!! :'(
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 19, 2010, 07:49:35 pm
Well now that I've taken a closer look at the trophy presentation photo I see that the big piece that flew off was already crooked when I got it. I must have been distracted by some other things that were warm, soft and that smelled nice. So it wasn't the taters after all.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Mar 20, 2010, 01:31:40 am
Well, its a nice pic of the bike, trophy, and those warm, smelly things you're talking about!  ;D :raider:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Mar 31, 2010, 03:59:00 pm
When riding in the rain wrap the right thigh and upper calf with something, like a velcro strap to keep the material off the rear pipe. My brand new rain suit melted to the pipe after a 500 mile ride in the rain. I was pushing the bike, from a seated position, up under Mom's front porch so I wouldn't wake anyone up at 2am. The leg just hit the pipe and was instant toast. I didn't know about bronze wool then either.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: cdnraider09 on Apr 26, 2010, 12:09:22 pm
I've learned a couple things in the 6500 miles I have rode in my life (on my raider, which was my first motorcycle) and that is never trust anyone in a car, and steer clear from "hardley" riders at or near bike rallies they always seem to be intoxicated and end up laying bikes down.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: 1starraider on May 07, 2010, 08:44:42 pm
 Ghost, that is good advise. When did you had a Worrier.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 07, 2010, 09:53:33 pm
 I had my Warrior from May of '03 to Sept of '08. No regrets there either. A great bike and was going to be the bike I'd be taking on this trip in July, but then the Raider came out and I instantly was hooked!
Ghost, that is good advise. When did you had a Worrier.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on May 08, 2010, 10:55:12 am
gostr8r: You've probably answered this already, but how many miles have you logged on your Raider? Also, what kind of maintenance (routine or repair) have you had done in those miles?

Thanks for all the info. I think a lot of guys look to you for your opinion because of your experience level - I know I do.  :)  The wife and I are preparing for our first major road trip (L.A. to K.C.) in mid-June and your tips/lessons learned have already proven very valuable in preparing.  Thanks again.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 08, 2010, 02:51:07 pm
Most welcome brother, that's why just I posted it. Knowing there were a lot of people headed out for the first time and can learn from my mistakes and experience. I'm still a newbie on the Raider tho, with a mere 27,000 miles in the 18 months of riding it. Many on our forum have logged much more than I so no bragging rights for me there. Thanks tho. I do my own oil and filter changes and have a magnetic disc on the end of the oil filter to pull the microscopic metal dust in the oil to one end and keeps the filter element cleaner too. Also check my tire pressures, [don't use Armour All on the treads] belt alignment and tension, fastener torques and lights, lube the pivot points on the levers, keep the filters clean by using the K&N products. I use a 91 octane or better only from a station that does ALOT of business, since gas goes stale and gets water fouled in those lesser productive storage tanks. Algae can grow and even thrive in fuel products too. I give it a treat every now and then of some well done pavement smoked pork too to keep it young. I keep it dusted before wiping it down to not wipe the dirt into the paint. Use fine grade BRONZE wool to get the smudges and accidental heel marks off the chrome. Use a leaf blower to knock off most of the water after a good deusching and a soap that doesn't strip the quality wax coat off. Having a Red bike, [arguably the very fastest followed by those Ravens, Tommy Blues and the Liquid Silvers] I don't leave it parked in direct sunlight any longer than I need to . The red colors are faster to fade than those slower colors are. I take what ever time I need to get it cleaned up and looking good for the drooler's that are out there. Last but not least ride it as much and safely as possible.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on May 10, 2010, 01:58:14 am
 :D :D :D Yep, Red ones are the fastest.  :D :D :D

A mere 27K? I might give you a run for that mileage - I'm at 9500 now (since Sep 09), am driving to KC next month, and the wife has fallen in love with Ruby as well and wants to ride as much as possible. Who knows how many miles I'll have on her this time next year.

Thanks again for all the tips...very much appreciated by me, and I'm sure by many other "Harley Slayer" riders out there.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 10, 2010, 03:29:30 am
You're welcome. Glad to hear another member has a sweetie that wants to ride. So many have ladies that can take it or leave it .
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on May 10, 2010, 07:21:59 pm
gostr8tr....keep me up-to-date on where you're riding. Who knows? Maybe we can meet somewhere and ride together for awhile.

Question for ya: What kind of pinion seat do you have and how does your wife like it? I'm getting the stocker reupholstered to widen and soften it. I'm also have him bolster the rear portion so it's squared off at the back. FNTMWLF had his done and his fiance really likes it. If Tracey don't care for it, guess I'll buy the Mustang Touring or the Corbin.  Wanted to get your opinion before plunking down that much dough.  8)
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Wavz on May 10, 2010, 08:37:29 pm
Wow what a lot of fun to read!! I have skipped over this thread many times for what reason I don't know. I am sure when I say this that most everyone one on this site would agree..."I wish Gostr8r lived next door to me." It would be nice to have someone with this much passion next door that you could run over with six pack and a nice bottle of wine for Kim and shoot the sh*t in the evenings. Your knowledge and gift of gab reminds me of my fathers. On our ride through the Lakes County of Minnesota we will stop by his place on the lake and you can meet him. I swear you two are two peas in a pod (and my wife says I am a chip off of the old block).

I look forward everyday to meet you in July when you come rolling through.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 10, 2010, 08:55:04 pm
Man I'm glad you got  a chance to see tis particular thread. If I had all these warm, wise, funny, talented and cool members as neighbors I would probably never leave town! I had to bump it a time or two cuz so much is going on this great forum and so many things are covered. I have more to offer, but sleep calls at my age earlier than most, so you're right, I'm like your Dad. Hell, my son Jason is older than many of the the members I've met and I want to be just like him when I grow up too. I hope we can get some riding in up there but my mouth is always in gear. KIm usually reminds me. but I'll be on my own for most of this trip. So brothers and sisters tell me when it's time to 'Shut up and ride!"   :rant: :rant: :poke: :thinking: :umno: :blah:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dreadly on May 10, 2010, 11:33:21 pm
gostr8tr....keep me up-to-date on where you're riding. Who knows? Maybe we can meet somewhere and ride together for awhile.

Question for ya: What kind of pinion seat do you have and how does your wife like it? I'm getting the stocker reupholstered to widen and soften it. I'm also have him bolster the rear portion so it's squared off at the back. FNTMWLF had his done and his fiance really likes it. If Tracey don't care for it, guess I'll buy the Mustang Touring or the Corbin.  Wanted to get your opinion before plunking down that much dough.  8)

I did my own. My wife said it was uncomfortable - so I cut out the middle, put in two layers in memory foam, then covered the top seat in memory foam and she really noticed a difference
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on May 12, 2010, 09:07:56 pm
dreadly: If your avatar is your wife, then she has all the "memory foam" she needs already!  :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Jun 15, 2010, 01:50:23 am
Just reread this thread, as i'm leaving Friday with my son, Jason to Cal. Going to the NASCAR race at Infineon, on Sunday!!

RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 25, 2010, 09:21:03 pm
What I've learned is about to be put to the test in less than a week now. I leave next Friday after work. Hope i'm prepared! :fingerscrossed:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Wavz on Jun 25, 2010, 09:53:02 pm
I can't wait to meet you in person!!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: WilCon on Jun 25, 2010, 09:56:40 pm
Don't forget phone cards for those just incase moments.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Jun 26, 2010, 12:26:54 am
Wishing you the very best ride you've ever had Ray!!  :chopper:  Looking forward to your arrival on July 23rd!! :shake: :yay: :drummer: :thumbs: :thewave: :rockon:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 26, 2010, 04:36:25 am
Thanks Larry, we're gonna have a very memorable journey and a great time with you, Sue and your daughter and sons! FYI I have a local buddy that says we should stop at his friend's Milano's for brunch in Bellingham. They open at 10am. The ride to his place and down to yours was supposed to be impressive.Just a thought.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 26, 2010, 04:37:37 am
Don't forget phone cards for those just incase moments.
That's a hell of a good tip!!!! Thanks brother, you learned me something.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: WilCon on Jun 26, 2010, 10:04:07 am
Learned that myself a long time ago and as a lifelong non-cellphone carrier. It's really nice if you need to use someones land line when you can tell them it won't cost them anything. Be safe out there.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: jacknife on Jun 26, 2010, 10:29:15 am
 I think that I remember you going through North Carolina on your way.What day are you planning on leaving out of Carolina into what Va. or Tn.? let me Know maybe we can hook up & ride a piece again.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 26, 2010, 01:20:05 pm
I think that I remember you going through North Carolina on your way.What day are you planning on leaving out of Carolina into what Va. or Tn.? let me Know maybe we can hook up & ride a piece again.
   I'm going up I-75 North to Flat Lick KY. So I'll be west of NC all the way up there on the 3rd of July. Coming back a month later tho I'll be riding down 25E South from Flat Lick again, all the way to Asheville NC on the 3rd of August. Maybe we can get together and come into town as a group ride.  :raider:  Roadkill is trying to put that together now.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: jacknife on Jun 26, 2010, 04:13:14 pm
 Thats Cool we will just have to do some riding from the rally best of wishes enjoy have fun and most of all return safely!!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 27, 2010, 07:57:05 pm
I took Wilcon's advice and bought a couple phone cards today, one for me and one for wifey. Also as another option and back up plan I managed to set up a Skype account so I can call free from computer to computer on the road. If anyone wants to be on my contact list for Skype I have the same username there too. PM me your username and number and we might be able to chat sometime. No promises tho, I'll be doing a lot more riding than talking on this trip!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on Jun 27, 2010, 11:40:25 pm
Hey Gostr8tr, just got back from an almost 4000-mile ride to KC and back!  Used some of your lessons learned and had an absolute BLAST on the ride!!!!  The wife had only been on the back for a couple of months (longest ride of 130 miles) but she made the ride with no problems and can't wait to go again - she's absolutely in love with the Raider!!

The biggest lesson learned for me was "DON'T OVERPACK!"  We took way too much stuff - so much so that it overworked the rear suspension (slammed, progressive spring, 2-up, and a 100 pounds of luggage on the rack was a little much I guess).  When we got to Missouri, we shipped back 25 pounds of stuff and still had more than enough for the ride...I should've taken your advice on packing a little more seriously.  :D :D :D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 28, 2010, 04:17:31 am
Yeah, we did the same thing in'06 on my California ride. My ridin' buddy sent a tailer mounted box full of stuff and I sent a 10 lb box of wifey's and my stuff home too. Our Yamaha's are just so very reliable and we really don't need that many clothes. Glad it went well and you both had a grand time. Hope it makes you want more of the same! We're already planning our ride to the Rally in '11, a ride to Nova Scotia in '12 and then a ride from Glacier NP down to the Arizona border in '13.   :raider:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on Jun 30, 2010, 02:17:56 am
DEFINITELY!!!  My wife is a true motorcycle momma now.   :D :D :D  3800 miles and she was sad when we pulled into the garage to complete the ride...she was ready to go back out for another 4000 miles.  Funniest thing was she was quoting Peter Fonda in Wild Hogs when he told the gang leader that he had forgotten what it's all about --- told him to get back out on the road and ride until he discovered it again.  My wife claims she discovered it on this trip - she loved EVERYTHING about riding.  How freakin' lucky am I?!?!?!?!?!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 30, 2010, 04:03:44 am
You did it right brother and you relationship just got a lot more interesting!!!!!!!! ;)
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dreadly on Jun 30, 2010, 03:34:30 pm
We're already planning our ride to the Rally in '11

I know you're focusing on Friday's big trip, but I'd be interested in your plans for 11. I plan on making the journey to the Rally if there is one.  ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jun 30, 2010, 05:28:14 pm
We're already planning our ride to the Rally in '11

I know you're focusing on Friday's big trip, but I'd be interested in your plans for 11. I plan on making the journey to the Rally if there is one.  ;D
  Wifey and I are going to take our Vacation just for the Rally in '11. You really need to make it happen! I'll talk to you about it up there in E-Town.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on Jul 07, 2010, 11:39:54 am
Rename this "What I've Learned in 15,000 miles of Raider Riding," and here's what I have:

1.  Hold the horses when you first put your girl on the back.  Unlike us guys, most women are simply NOT impressed with the massive torque of our beasts.
2.  Let your girl get used to the feel of the bike gradually.  When Tracey first started riding 2-Up, the leaning made her very nervous and she wasn't crazy about the acceleration or highway speeds.  She wanted to take it ENTIRELY too easy for a Raider.  Now, after getting used to the bike gradually, she's perfectly fine running 70-80 on the slab-slab (she now takes pictures while running at that speed) and she doesn't get nervous about leaning until she hears the pegs scrape.  O8O
3.  Make them comfortable gradually so they appreciate the difference.  :D  Tracey rode with the stock seat and pegs, then I had the seat bolstered and reupholstered, after the next ride I installed the Cobra Swept floorboards, then a gel pad.  Now I'm buying the Butty Buddy for her which should increase her comfort even more.  Now she'd rather ride than take the car ANYTIME!  It's great when the wife asks, "Where can we ride today?"  :)
4.  Listen to what Gostr8r has to say and take advantage of his miles of experience.  Along that line though, if you haven't lived his life, you'll find a lot of his warnings won't apply (fights, brawls, concerts, hanging out with biker gangs, etc.)   :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: cdnraider09 on Jul 07, 2010, 12:31:34 pm
what I have learned in 7000k miles of riding.....Listen to the older more mature guys who have been riding forever, and I don't know it all  ;)
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Rick Busbea on Jul 09, 2010, 10:58:44 pm
what I have learned in 7000k miles of riding.....Listen to the older more mature guys who have been riding forever, and I don't know it all  ;)

Wow, I thought we'd ridden a lot of miles, but cdnraider09 has gone over 7,000,000 according to his post (7000k)!!!!!  Wow, I'm impressed.   :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: cdnraider09 on Jul 10, 2010, 08:22:09 am
oops my bad lol i meant 7000 miles. I'd be the champ if my raider made 7000K miles.  :o I need to re read my posts and double check before i post them.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on Jul 10, 2010, 07:23:45 pm
I have learned to take ibuprofen before and after
my day long trips....it works wonders
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: cdnraider09 on Jul 13, 2010, 03:37:10 pm
most kids on crotch rockets ride like morons. MR.T can probably vouch for me on this one.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Jul 13, 2010, 05:41:32 pm
most kids on crotch rockets ride like morons. MR.T can probably vouch for me on this one.

 :agree:

10' tall and bulletproof.   
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: WilCon on Jul 13, 2010, 05:52:41 pm
That's me.  ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Jul 13, 2010, 05:59:50 pm
That's me.  ;D

You should change your forum name to 10TAB (10TallAndBulletproof).    ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: cdnraider09 on Jul 14, 2010, 06:19:26 am
The moron we witnessed wouldn't have been so bulletproof if he would have kissed the asphalt and been run over by his buddies lol.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: JazzyzGurl on Jul 26, 2010, 10:25:34 am
I have learned to take ibuprofen before and after
my day long trips....it works wonders
:agree:

I've also learned that Ziploc bags (1 gallon & bigger) are the most useful packing tool out there.  All my stuff gets sorted and put into them, squeeze out the air & seal them closed, then they go into the bags.  Everything is safe from rain/snow/dropping in the mud/etc. and it is easy to locate what you are looking for in the clear bags.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RiotRaider on Dec 10, 2010, 06:34:54 pm
i have a question myself...what are some must have tools when you are on the road with a raider ???
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on Dec 13, 2010, 06:13:04 am
I found that having a metric ratchett set and Allen sockets
will get you around well.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: cdnraider09 on Dec 13, 2010, 08:07:09 am
all harleys break down on rides and that metz tires suck the big one!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Biker Cowboy on Jan 06, 2011, 08:47:24 pm
geeze gostr8r... wish you'd a reminded me to call the bank... Before... I left and headed into canada  on my way to Alaska ;) seems they don't like it when you go international without tellin' 'em...

I tried to tell 'em... "But, I'm NOT anywhere international... I'm in Canada!"  ;D

would have been a lot easier if my advancing Old Timers Syndrome wasn't quite so advanced, so I could remember a mite more...

Hmmmm... think I'll copy down your tips as a memory starter!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: BIGdaddy03 aka THE K-9 SLAYER on Feb 21, 2011, 09:21:54 pm
recently..... when you least expect it, that next routine corner isn't so routine!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Feb 22, 2011, 04:46:55 am
geeze gostr8r... wish you'd a reminded me to call the bank... Before... I left and headed into canada  on my way to Alaska ;) seems they don't like it when you go international without tellin' 'em...

I tried to tell 'em... "But, I'm NOT anywhere international... I'm in Canada!"  ;D

would have been a lot easier if my advancing Old Timers Syndrome wasn't quite so advanced, so I could remember a mite more...

Hmmmm... think I'll copy down your tips as a memory starter!  I thought I did mention about calling the bank in advance  to prevent any credit card rejections. Maybe not tho, my Old Timers is in it's progressive state too.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dirtman1 on May 10, 2011, 10:33:06 pm
I read all nine pages and one thing that caught my attention was the gum rapper an fuse. That was good to know. I learn something new everyday.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: KRAYZ1 on May 11, 2011, 12:39:37 am
all Harley's break down on rides and that metz tires suck the big one!
Our Road King has been 27,874 miles and it has never left me on the side of the road and this summer I will be adding about 5,000 more to that ... It is all in how you take care of your motorcycle not what kind it is . I like our HD for two up and long trips it is a pack mule not a hot rod .
I have had about every kind of bike you can think of and they have all got me where I wanted to be  "In The Wind"
But I do not like metz tires ..
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: jkskeet on May 18, 2011, 11:56:00 pm
I've passed up this thread countless times but finally got around to reading it and all i can say is 'thanks ray'!!

Awesome experience and knowledge.....

I will definitely e looking @ this before we leave to go 9+hrs to eureka springs arkansas here in a couple weeks...   The wife is going to sit out on this one but she loves to ride and asks to go all the time... We've done 6-8hr days and she loves it.. Just getting used to the cornering thing but does really well ;D

Thanks for your tips ray and I really hope to meet ya soon...  I'd LOVE to make the rally this year but it'll prolly have to wait until next :'(

Thanks buddy ;D ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 19, 2011, 10:00:54 am
You very welcome! If it helps even just a little bit to make the journey more successful, safer, or more enjoyable then it was worth the time I took to put it out for you. I'll keep adding to that thread and will give credit to those that shared their tips with me so I can pass them on to you. On thing I have learned is that keeping wifey excited about riding with me is the smartest thing I can do. It's such a great way to spend our time together and our m/c vacations have taken a top priority in our budget planning so we can see the continent. We have a life time of memories already in the 7 summer trips that we have done. Looks like you get around too so running into each other is bound to happen sooner or later. :raider:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on May 19, 2011, 10:09:25 am
You very welcome! If it helps even just a little bit to make the journey more successful, safer, or more enjoyable then it was worth the time I took to put it out for you. I'll keep adding to that thread and will give credit to those that shared their tips with me so I can pass them on to you. On thing I have learned is that keeping wifey excited about riding with me is the smartest thing I can do. It's such a great way to spend our time together and our m/c vacations have taken a top priority in our budget planning so we can see the continent. We have a life time of memories already in the 7 summer trips that we have done. Looks like you get around too so running into each other is bound to happen sooner or later. :raider:

I was just recently discussing this with my dad and he said when he had his big Yamaha touring bike that him and my mom had a blast on it traveling from place to place.  He really misses it.  Unfortunately my mom is in no condition to ride anymore, so it's just him.  Enjoy it while you can!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 19, 2011, 11:01:58 am
Yeah I hope Kim's health holds up as long as mine does. Wait a minute  :o, she's a lot healthier than I am  :rolleyes: :rolleyes:!Can't imagine traveling witout her tho  :shrug: :shrug:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 19, 2011, 11:35:55 am
There's been a few comments about tool kits and we all have our own ideas of what we should take. It really seems to be dictated by the isolation you might be traveling thru. The further out there and less likely you are to encounter someone that can help the more you might want to pack for. Here's a minimal tool bag that I take [at all times] and there's a bunch of smaller items in that zipped up side pocket too. I also take what I need to pull the rear wheel off.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: ellcapitan on Jul 29, 2011, 06:20:13 pm
I admire the knowledge and respect the advice...

One thing I think is worthy of adding, if I may, is to be especially vigilant around moving trucks/vans. In fact, it wouldn't be a bad idea to just STAY AWAY from them at all costs, at all times. The drivers usually have a whole lot on their minds...none of which concerns your safety...and they usually are not the best at handling these relatively large vehicles to begin with. I believe these vehicles pose the greatest risk to the M/C-ist.

Also, DO NOT ride before dawn or after dusk during deer rutting season.  Doing so is asking for a fast trip to an emergency room! (Ask me...and my six now-healed ribs...how I know.) These creatures are unpredictable anyways, but during their mating season they turn into (still-unpredictable) maniac hormone-driven kamikazis from Hell.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Jul 29, 2011, 07:11:51 pm
Very good points ellcapitan! I stay away from the big rigs too, and mainly because I can't see past them to know what's ahead, and another big reason is the foot wide and 7 foot long alligator retreads they sling off at any given moment. One of those will take a bike out in a second. If I can get ahead of them I will or stay waaaaay back.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: CHROMINATOR on Sep 14, 2011, 08:35:35 am
Incredible advice, I copied it and put it in a checklist format laminated it and will use it before every road trip, thanks tons.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Sep 14, 2011, 04:13:45 pm
Very good points ellcapitan! I stay away from the big rigs too, and mainly because I can't see past them to know what's ahead, and another big reason is the foot wide and 7 foot long alligator retreads they sling off at any given moment. One of those will take a bike out in a second. If I can get ahead of them I will or stay waaaaay back.

Point taken sir...

A couple of weeks ago I was in South Carolina (I-85) heading into North Carolina and (brain fart) I was following a Semi.   And yes.... BLAM!!!  Right rear tire starts slinging rubber everywhere.   As luck (God) would have it.... every piece... large and tiny... went either to my left or right.  Not one piece came anywhere near me.   :whew:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: CHROMINATOR on Sep 14, 2011, 08:11:51 pm
Whoa Mr.T lucky is right, glad that worked out for you, every time I see a semi it gives me the chills because I once was hit by tread from a tire but fortunately I was in my truck when it happened.  Put a huge dent in the grill.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Sep 14, 2011, 08:24:20 pm
I know there's some logic somewhere, but it seems to me that the retreads should be outlawed due to the danger they pose to m/c's and if nothing else the damn mess on our hiways!!!!!! >:(
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Sep 14, 2011, 08:52:14 pm
Lot more economical to buy recaps, besides the trucking industry has got several politicians in their pockets. Being in the driving school business, i've seen this several times, and it's never any fun!


RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Sep 15, 2011, 04:42:03 am
Always thought the dollar was the reason, having to raise our cost of goods to haul them. The cost of lives and injuries doesn't seem to be in the equation tho.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: ellcapitan on Sep 16, 2011, 07:58:52 pm
It's actually not the fact that they're retreads that's the problem. The problem is that they're not good quality retreads. Retreads CAN be made to be very safe if done properly; in fact even airliner tires are retreads (!), but they're made to such a high standard that delamination failure is all but unheard of.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on Nov 19, 2011, 01:31:57 pm
Good information. I will keep that in mind on my trip when i go take my trips.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 19, 2011, 09:12:28 pm
Here's one of the culprit contributors that rolled in on my job site last week hauling a 35ton piece of precast for me to set. I decked his trailer onto another one so he could just go back put more rubber back on and do it all over again. >:(
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: ROADKILL on Nov 19, 2011, 10:40:04 pm
You should have put the headache ball through both trialers
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 20, 2011, 12:37:57 am
I like the thought of that Gary, but I already have to leave the cab to go piss enough as it is  :-[. Doing that is a sure way to get drug tested yet again.  5O I don't mind all the random checks, but I don't ever want to get a mandatory one for damaging something. This is about as close as I'll ever get to hitting one of those bums and their trailers.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: ellcapitan on Nov 20, 2011, 09:14:53 am
Crane Operator? ...I just had a nasty flashback; I nearly killed three people one time... I'm a railroad employee, and a while back I used to work in a locomotive maintenance and repair back-shop. One day, we were changing out an engine's turbo unit...which is about the size of a medium-size bedroom. The old/bad unit had already been removed by a previous shift. I was upstairs operating the big overhead crane, installing the new unit. I had to clear this unit over the sides of the locomotive and lower it in through an open hatch from the top, over the engine compartment, where three workers were waiting to start zipping it into place.

There were two problems which I knew about, and a third which I DIDN'T know about...

First, from where I was positioned overhead, although I could hear their instructions, I could not physically see any of the workers below, inside the engine compartment, while the turbo was up in the air. I'm sure you can understand better than most (although I'm also sure it's not too hard for anyone to understand), this alone made me quite nervous.

Second, we had found the rigging we were planning to use had some broken strands, so we decided not to use it. But, the only other set of rigging we had available was a little longer. It was in good condition, so that's what we used. Turns out it was too long!

So, aware of the fact that I would have to raise the spool basket up higher in order to clear the side of the body with the longer rigging, I was paying close attention to only BARELY clearing the side and not going up too far--looking at the bottom of the turbo as it was going up and over...NOT at the spool basket.

This leads to the third problem. ...Just like in most situations in this type of work environment, it was a combination of multiple failures that lead to a perfect storm of disaster (near-disaster in this case, thank GOD). Unbeknownst to anyone, the upper limit switch, which is supposed to prevent the spool basket from going up too far and causing damage to the crane's cables, had failed! So, even though I thought I had stopped it in time (I never relied on the limit switch anyway), just the inertia of all that weight, along with the time it actually takes to center that big control lever on that circa-1908 crane...movement doesn't always stop exactly when you expect it to. The cabled binded, snapped, and the whole thing came falling down on top of these three guys inside the engine compartment, violently-whipping cables and all!

Although I managed to scream a blood-curdling warning, there may have only been about one second to spare. I was sure it was not enough. Not being able to actually see them, I was sure there were at least serious injurys...and that was being as optimistic as I could. Turned out the warning was enough...they all found nooks to crouch in amidst all that metal in there, and eventually (it seemed to me like it took forever) they all came out with not even a scratch.

Other than the failed crane and the trashed turbo, I was the biggest casualty. When I finally decided it was safe for me to brave the ladder and I came down out of that crane, they told me they never seen someone's face so green. This may have been the most terrifying day of my life. 
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 20, 2011, 09:32:48 am
I don't know any operator in the industry that has been running cranes for very long that hasn't 2 blocked a crane in some way or another. It's far easier to do on telescopics and friction rigs than overheads and almost always turns out to be operator error. I did it in '85 and it made me sooooo much more aware of the hook's movements and proximity to the head sheaves from that day forward. It's really important when we can't see the boom tip, like is the case in many of my projects that have the head section out over the top edge of the building and I'm working with minimum clearances. Here's an example of just that. Since no one was injured there's nothing disgraceful in that story at all, as long as you learned from the mistake and became a better worker for it. Thanks for sharing too.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: ellcapitan on Nov 20, 2011, 10:10:37 am
I guess I must have learned something. They trust me to run passenger trains now  :o, and have been doing so for 6 years without incident.

For show-purposes, it's all about "safety", but in practice, the railroad--a comparatively ancient industry--always seems to assume immunity to the structured safety regulations that other industries must adhere to. But after that day, we all (for the first time) recieved Osha crane operator safety traning and certification. It was a blanket solution to make sure the "House-Maintenance" guys got their training especially, for maintaining this nearly-100 year old relic. Personally, I didn't need the Osha cert. to make me a safer operator (obviously), but at the time I was still glad to get it because of the value it had on the "outside", should I ever had decided to look for a career change...

Crane incidents did happen in the old days, in that shop. Fortunately no one has ever been killed. But to my knowledge, there has never been another incident since that training began, so I guess it worked! I, myself, went on operating that same crane for another couple of years before I promoted to Engineer.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 20, 2011, 11:21:13 am
Excellent outcome to a bad situation! We have more than a Raider in common brother! I hope to meet you in person someday.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: ellcapitan on Nov 20, 2011, 11:34:54 am
Likewise, thanks.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on Jun 10, 2012, 12:55:27 pm
Thanx to my Brother Ray, I again go to his posts about distance riding, and what to bring along. This would be the third year for me to take Ray on road (so to speak  ;D ). I know if I include the items that are relevant for my ride, I got it covered. As so many have said before when using his advice; THANX RAY!! I look forward to sharing the wind with you again next year!


I can't take credit for all this stuff but will share it. I had made laminated maps of each day's ride on a separate sheet with written turn by turns, and distances on the opposite sides. I got a folder with a clear cover and had Kim keep me up to date as we rode along. She would change out the map every day accordingly and it was always right there on her lap in the book bag. I use a fuel bung to top off so I don't get the back splashes. If I calculate the amount close enough and pay cash the pumps slows down for the last 50 cents too. I also put the gas cap on the right grip between the throttle and the brake lever so it doesn't fall off and get scratched or contaminated. It's a good tight fit up there. I'll turn the wheel fully left just before it stops rolling to avoid the grinding of the tire tread in one spot each time and to make room for the nozzle. On the full left turn thought , Do something to remind your self not to pull away from a parked spot with the forks locked! It's a no brainer, but many seasoned riders have made the same dumb move, me included, and paid the price for it. Leather saddle bags are over rated. I had Willie Max bags for 10 years and they still looked better than any leather ones after their 1st year! You can wash the PVC bags. Key trinkets and gadgets that touch the chrome switch cover will scratch it up eventually, and you'll be sorry you didn't just keep a single key on a small ring. Same with the popular fork bags on bikes with OEM length tubes. They do scuff and mark up the fender paint unless you take measures with some soft material to protect it. It's a subtle but sure scraping and rubbing of your clear coat. If you have ass length hair I recommend you keep it tucked in the back of your shirt. 2 reasons, first it doesn't fray and end up like a barrel cleaner from whipping around and secondly wifey can't use it as a rev limiter when you want to have a little freshly well done smoked HOG. I'm a big fan of heated garments now that I've tried them. If that's too pricey then layered outfits top and bottom help and the hot pockets on the inside pockets of your jackets and in the boots help some too. Kim keeps here's in her mittens for at least 12 hours. She has a blue tongue and no circulation at all. My little frozen Butter Ball Turkey! A rain suit blocks some of the cold air and can save you some packing space in a pinch. Ear plugs help in the cold if you ride with a half lid or none at all. I have some spring loaded ear muffs that will stay on too but my fav is the lined and quilted aviators cap that covers the whole head, sides of the face and forehead too. I also use a lined face mask. In a pinch on the side of the road you can jack your bike up off the ground. I get something to put under the right side of the frame as I push the bike hard over against the kick stand, then go around to the left side and repeat the process with the same amount of wood or a covered brick as you push the bike hard over to the exhaust side. When you let it go the bike will be elevated enough to spin a wheel. Once in desperation I backed over a curb to bottom out my Pan head, so I could rebuild the wheel cylinder on the side of the road. It was 25 degrees and I still had 500 miles to go with a broken left foot. It was 19 degrees when i rolled in at the AF Base at 3 am. Help another rider that's down on the side of the road! I met most of my friends for the first 22 years when I was broke down with my HD's. It helped me become more effective at repairs but met some cool people too. Do something on your ride to help others any way. I'm ashamed that I haven't stepped up earlier in a Pennies Of Passion type effort on my other 6 trips. The traveling flag is a start that will grow and touch the lives of many and who knows what will come from that. Plan for a new rear tire on a ride of more that 8K or so. The roads surfaces, temps, speeds and hard mountain carving and starts and stops take they're toll early. Take a small assortment of inexpensive gifts for some of the brothers that you'll meet on the road. That could be our RSR drop cards, a tiny piece of something that he can use, like an O ring or cap to a swing arm axle nut from a quart of Amzoil. It dates the moment and helps you remember each other's meeting for the 1st time. I keep a long skinny feather duster in the bags to brush off the dust that settles everyday at work and where ever. It really helps.  More to came later my friends!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: jughead on Jun 29, 2012, 10:44:07 pm
Not sure if this one has been mentioned.............

2 Gallon zip lock bags, 1 changing of clothes in each bag, sit on bag to squeeze out the air, seal bag while sitting on it. Works like a miniature space bag. 

Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: cdnraider09 on Nov 01, 2012, 02:58:25 pm
park the bike during the hot summer months in texas and ride in the ac lol
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 01, 2012, 05:01:54 pm
Thank you Larry, I will add to this thread and canít wait for the chance to jam with you again. Likely when we finally make a WARR event. I like the idea of the plastic bags too. I usually cover my touring pack on the back of the bike with a 3mm thick contractors cleanup bag as well. BTW it has over 71K on it now too.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Nov 02, 2012, 07:22:59 am
park the bike during the hot summer months in texas and ride in the ac lol

Spoken like a true Canadian.    ;D
Dude!!   Where have you been? 
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: bigjohn on Nov 13, 2012, 09:49:50 pm
you can plan all you can..but i'd rather pray. Jesus is the one who looks out for some of us. all others[i mean really] should carry a gun or at least some mace. there are millions of desperate drug addicts lookin for out of towners.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 14, 2012, 06:20:05 am
Agreed bigjohn. I would have packed my 9mm, but some places around the continent that will get me arrested so I opted not to. I did however take a weapons disarmament course, TLMís Fighting Chance Combat System, to take control of a thugs weapon, breakdown his foundation, vision and breathing and then use his own weapon on him if he somehow manages to get back up, blind, crippled and bleeding.  :crutch:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: bigjohn on Nov 17, 2012, 05:30:58 am
i have a question. i recently purchase a berger liner and gloves with the dual controller. the sales lady said to try them first before i bought the pants. do you feel that pants are ness. for 20 degree riding or long cold rides? big john
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: bigjohn on Nov 17, 2012, 05:36:17 am
i heard from a local gun nut that it is not illegal to carry an exposed handgun. is this true? and has anyone tried this? and what would be your opinion if you saw a biker with a gun?
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 17, 2012, 06:41:27 am
Unless you will be riding in those lower temps very Ďoften' then no they arenít really nessí. I opted for a heated seat and itís GREAT! It really only keeps the butt and upper legs, in the back, nice and toasty but that helps. The more often and the farther youíll go then the more it becomes a great way to go heaving the extra heated gear! I love my heated pant and jacket liners and they each give more muscle warmth than gloves do! I have ridden thousands of miles in freezing weather, but not very many with my heated gear tho. Thatís a relatively new thing for me. Point is I had always layered long johns, pants and sometimes chaps, and in extreme temps I put on my leather pants. For rides under 50/100 miles in freezing temps I will get by with just layering, but more than 100 miles can bring the body temp down enough to cause you to quiver, tremble, shake and become fatigued due to the constant muscle tension. Thatís when the leather pants came in handy. If it's 'several hundred miles' the heated gear is all GOOD! Also keep in mind that electric gloves only keep the hands Ďcomfortable', but not really very warm, where the pants actually will give the legs muscles some real warmth like the jacket liner will do that for the torso. I look forward to using mine again, and the only real downside is getting used to the wires, how to make all the connections and get at the controller with out being distracted. A few years ago we did a Christmas vacation in Salt Lake City, Utah and it was in the single digits or less each day. We hit a Burlington Coat Factory and each bought some great snow mobile suits, with jackets, pants, gloves and boots. We NEVER felt cold in that stuff at all! It was very fairly priced and much cheaper than the leather or heated gear. I wore it several times to work, round trip about 90 miles, when it was in the very low 30ís. It was very comfy and itís not heavy either. The fingers/hands and toes/feet, being the extremities, are usually going to be the hardest to keep warm. A heated seat and or the Hot Hands type heated packets that you can put in your pant and jacket pockets also will help you get home with less shivering. Keep the head warm and the wind from getting down your collar too and youíll be better off as well. Carrying a hand gun has a different effect on different folks. To the average person without any bad intentions, itís just an attention getter. To the thug that might want to challenge you in some way, it gets his attention too. It represents a free weapon that he can use on YOU, if he can get the jump on you and take control of it before you can react. He WILL be thinking of taking it from you too. Now he has a free gun! YOURS! If it is so secure that he canít get it from you then it's not much use in a split second reaction if he is within close quarters, cuz you wonít be able to pull it, unlock it and have a clean shot before he is all over you! He might play it smart and just follow you around till youíre alone, [maybe even at home and in bed] and then make his move. He already knows thereís a gun to be had where you go. IMO a weapon is best when kept as a secret and only revealed to an assailant that is unaware of what and who he is fíing with! The element of surprise is much more effective than reacting to someone that tries you because they want your gun. Once they take it from you what are you going to do? Run after them?   ???                                                                                                                                                                       
i have a question. i recently purchase a berger liner and gloves with the dual controller. the sales lady said to try them first before i bought the pants. do you feel that pants are ness. for 20 degree riding or long cold rides? big john
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 17, 2012, 07:24:08 am
A biker with a gun Ďexposed' only makes me think he 'wants' to show it off and itís his way of saying ĎFEAR ME, I have a gun and I WILL USE THIS ON YOU IF YOU Fí WITH ME!í That doesnít impress me. In fact I donít see the holstered piece as a deterrent at all. It would impress me much more if he pulled it out of nowhere, and was still able to use it on the poor jack ass  ;D that challenged him but didnít know he had it  :yikes:. The days of people being attacked by punches and kicks are all but over. Now itís almost always some kind of weapon and the punks out there want a weapon to do their dirty deeds using it for maximum intimidation. Showing your weapon only gives that hardened street smart thug some food for thought on how heís going to take you down  :thinking: and get the gun from you. If he doesnít see one he looks for someone that else that does and waits for his chance. Or seeks a weak looking victim that wonít be able to defend themselves effectively.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: bigjohn on Nov 20, 2012, 05:22:10 pm
tried putting my gas cap on the grip and front brake...and it works...no more leaving my cap rollin around on the top of a dirty gas pump...thanks 250,000 mile man...big john
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 21, 2012, 06:51:16 am
It does work well, and if the bars get turned just a bit to the left, as you roll that last foot up to the pump, it's a bit more stable on that little perched resting spot up there too ;).
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Nov 21, 2012, 06:56:09 am
Always keep a set of daytime  8) and night time riding glasses  :o when out and about on the road. I work nights now and once in a while I donít get home until after the sun comes up. I end up being blinded by the morning glare coming from the east as I head home from the project I am currently on. Still learning to remember the things that I had already learned when I was much younger and less forgetful.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: sasharaider on May 17, 2013, 10:31:37 am
Prep and packing are obviously related to where [away from civilization and gas, unfamiliar roads, etc], how far and  when you go [climate extremes] and if you ride alone or 2 up. For this post I wanted to cover 2 up cross country journey's. I obviously spent the money on the Corbin touring kit and a T bag, so use what use can of this and disregard the rest of my rant. In the planning stages seek feedback from others that have gone before you to the same places and in the same season. Take the 'common goods ands bad points' that they all give and apply them accordingly. Call or search online for up to date road conditions such as closures and repairs. Have your sled serviced, use lock tight on the fasteners and start with good rubber! Notify the bank or credit card companies so they don't refuse your purchases or embarrass you at a gas station. Carry a gas can unless your sure of the stops and supply. Let a friend know of your ETA's each day by phone, just in the extreme case you leave the rode and end up in a ditch or someplace that isn't visible from the highway. Minimize night riding, or at least wear highly reflective vests. Weather permitting, get early starts, and experience high altitude sunrises and sunsets. Take advantage of National Park Passes, frequent flier miles and motel promos. Consider a LoJack or some anti theft equipment. Check your tires, axle nuts, lights and luggage stability regularly. Cruise controls, hi-way pegs, back support and free ballin' body powders are a must for the long rides. Keep your eyes well protected and moving back and forth across the road [stop or let the passenger do the picture taking] and ride like you're invisible [figure that they don't see you at all]. Stay way back from, or ahead of the big rigs to avoid running the reds lights behind them and also to avoid their recaps and rock slinging at your face. Stay within 10 mph of the postedlimits, Kojack and his Kodack love tourists! Hydrate, stretch and snack at gas stops. Use 'both' hand and electric turn signals. Cover the longest distances early on and gradually get shorter for a couple days before going long again. Get business or post cards from the places that you would recommend to others. Meet and greet the locals and patronize their diners. Promote the Raider Rally and the RSR Forum with drop cards and reach out to your other members on the road. Take road sign photos of obscure turns into great places, and make a nightly video diary, all to help you stay focused on what you did, how you felt and how you got there. When you get stressed out or upset remember that you could also be unemployed, homeless and on foot, but instead your in the wind on a Raider! Now for packing, I have some suggestions too. Remember your docs', DL, AAA, AARP, credit cards that say check ID [also carry an expired one to give the thug that robs you at gun point], plus insurance and registration cards. Both of you have cell phones at all times. Take a tank bag or at least a mid size gym bag, or book bag,for the passengers lap. Here I pack the easy access items: a kick stand plate, camera batteries, snacks, water, sunblock, chap stick, bug spray, maps, hand towel [for a wet seat], sani-wipes or hand gel, RSR drop cards and a pen, octane booster, flashlight, scarfs, gloves, glasses, camera batteries, a multi-tool and even a roll of toilet paper! Under a bungie net I keep rain suits [which can be used in place of bulkier jackets and chaps], Spider Feet [for the boots] and either a half bike cover or a large contractors clean up bag to cover the luggage in the rain. In a removable pack [for hauling into the motel room] I have the clothes [4 pair of socks, 3 t-shirts at the most, a dress shirt, 2 jeans, her pj's, flip flops, walking shoes, bathing suit, and do laundry on the 4th day] plus your med's and vitamins, all the chargers, USB and AVI cables, make-up and shave kits. On the bike I keep the tool kit bagged up with offset screw drivers, a small set of allen's, combo wrenches and 3/8th drive sockets, knife, retractable mechanical fingers, mirror and magnet, electrical needle nose and vise grip pliers and a wide jaw 6" crescent. In a repair bag kit I have a small assortment of zip ties, fuses, bulbs, connectors, hose clamps, a lighter and shrink tube, Locktite, a spark plug, tire repair kit and a DC operated mini air compressor or Fix-a-flat, plus teflon, electrical and duct tapes. and lastly I have a cleaning kit with bronze wool, ammonia free windex [closed up], micro fiber clothes, a good paste wax, cotton gloves, hand wipes and best of all the throw away black cotton rags from my Harley shirts after I cut off the inked in areas. I know this is along read, but if it helps any one at all pass it on.
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me. Has that happened to you previously?

Man it sounds like you've traveled cross the country 10x :p  O8O
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on May 17, 2013, 11:12:19 am
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: CHROMINATOR on May 17, 2013, 11:14:20 am
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.

Just hope the thief doesn't look at it closely...  :yikes:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on May 17, 2013, 11:19:57 am
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.

Just hope the thief doesn't look at it closely...  :yikes:

I can't imagine they're going to hang out that long. Plus if they're staring at the card to determine if it's real, you take that moment to club them over the head with something. Or if you'tre carrying (which I don't), pull out your firearm.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on May 17, 2013, 12:05:37 pm
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.

Just hope the thief doesn't look at it closely...  :yikes:

I can't imagine they're going to hang out that long. Plus if they're staring at the card to determine if it's real, you take that moment to club them over the head with something. Or if you'tre carrying (which I don't), pull out your firearm.
:agree: ;D ;D
Title: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Pale_Rider on May 17, 2013, 06:12:28 pm
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.
I just steal other people's cards to give to thugs who would rob me haha. Nah I never carry cash and my wallet has more gift card than anything.  I'll just give them some of those.  Don't use them anyway. 
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on May 17, 2013, 07:06:54 pm
 ;D ;D Theyd be a mad person to get my wallet. I normally dont keep nothing in it normally dont have money to put in the thing
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on May 17, 2013, 07:41:20 pm
This is great advice. I really like the idea of keeping a spare credit card for the thugs that try to rob me.

I wonder if you could get away with those fake credit cards that come in the mail for promotions.  Or just carry an expired or cancelled card.
I just steal other people's cards to give to thugs who would rob me haha. Nah I never carry cash and my wallet has more gift card than anything.  I'll just give them some of those.  Don't use them anyway.

The conversation later...  "Man, all I got was a gift card to Bed, Bath & Beyond and a coupon for buy one get one free at Subway."
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RedStar Raider on May 18, 2013, 03:35:19 pm
tried putting my gas cap on the grip and front brake...and it works...no more leaving my cap rollin around on the top of a dirty gas pump...thanks 250,000 mile man...big john

I learned that from the man myself!! THANX Ray!!

RSR
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on May 19, 2013, 05:09:38 am
Since I first rode with Ray.......4 years ago, I seen him do that......wow!!!!
Great idea, especially since I dropped my gas cap one time.....doh!!!!

Never again though ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 20, 2013, 12:50:35 am
No sasharaider Iíve never been robbed of my cards. But was I almost kidney stabbed by someone that wanted who steal my chopper, dogged every bullet from a full magazine shot at me from close range, caught on fire while sleeping in the snow too close to a campfire, assaulted by two police officers and had to fight for my life, and the flesh on my leg was tore up right thru my leather pants by a large dog that I didnít even know was near me until I felt the pain. Does any of that count? So youíll know, I went cross country form south Florida to Thunder Bay Canada in í82 on my rigid í57 Panhead, then my next real journey was in í03 to Surgis on my Drifter, then again on the Warrior in í04. I went roundtrip to the west coast and up to Washington State in í06, to Quebec and New Brunswick in í07, toured Nevada, Utah Arizona iní08, to Wisconsin in í09, to North Pole Alaska in í10, then a couple little rides to our Raider Rallies in í11 and í12. And just this morning I completed my 4th Iron Butt Ride, this one a 1500 mile Bun Burner. Dawn actually rode with me on part of this one too  :yourock: :shake: :notworthy:.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 20, 2013, 12:56:54 am
I have more to add now that the Iron Butt Ride is done, but itís late. I havenít caught up on the sleep yet from the 31 hour ride, and need to do some narration/editing before I post about what I learned from the 1500 mile ride this weekend. ;) Yaíll know me and Iím looooong winded  :rolleyes:, so there will be a bunch ;D.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on May 20, 2013, 06:42:18 am
I have to say that I had a wonderful weekend and that wet ride definitely contributed to it. Really, I feel extremely blessed to have met the awesome Raider brothers I now consider a part of my family.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Madcow on May 20, 2013, 07:01:03 am
 :cheers:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on May 20, 2013, 08:34:34 am
I have more to add now that the Iron Butt Ride is done, but itís late. I havenít caught up on the sleep yet from the 31 hour ride, and need to do some narration/editing before I post about what I learned from the 1500 mile ride this weekend. ;) Yaíll know me and Iím looooong winded  :rolleyes: , so there will be a bunch ;D .
31 hour Ride. :yikes:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on May 20, 2013, 10:41:03 am
I don't care what anyone says......he's the man and an awesome friend

Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: woodog on May 20, 2013, 12:32:59 pm
I don't care what anyone says......he's the man and an awesome friend

 :agree:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 20, 2013, 01:08:12 pm
I must pay you all in person at the Rally for the kind words! :rolleyes: I just spent a few hours giving GOSTR8R a well deserved bath and will do an oil change this week too. Wifey already doesnít want me doing another one >:(. Phhhffft! Maybe ;D!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 20, 2013, 01:15:31 pm
Sweet Tooth, itís really only about 24 hours in the saddle, but by the time you stop 15 or 20 times for whatever, it adds way up. 36 hours they allow is easily 4 hours more than you need. You can even take an alarm clock and take a couple 2 hour naps, which I was prepared to do too. Note the pillow I had behind me in some of the pics I posted. I made up a tip list to add to my original thread, and itís already over 40 items long so, I will spend some time editing/narrating the ones most important and try to start posting them within a few days or so. :shake:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on May 20, 2013, 03:12:41 pm
Longest straight so far ive don was around 11 hrs straight. minus gas stops. The last few hours were the worst. Thats only because it was so cold at like 1 n the morning. Im sure if id had my heated gear i bought i could have done it longer. But 24 hrs straight. ;D Thats past the iron butt . Titanium butt ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 21, 2013, 11:01:14 am
My Corbin saddle, GOSTR8Rís ergos and full dresser advantages made the 1500+ miles a walk in the park! :raider:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: RonKy on May 21, 2013, 12:24:18 pm
You're the man Ray!  What kind of raingear did you use to keep that iron butt from rusting?
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on May 21, 2013, 12:26:17 pm
You're the man Ray!  What kind of raingear did you use to keep that iron butt from rusting?

vaseline!     ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on May 21, 2013, 12:27:04 pm
You're the man Ray!  What kind of raingear did you use to keep that iron butt from rusting?

vaseline!     ;D

I did not need that picture in my head.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 21, 2013, 01:04:35 pm
I had a Frogge Toggs top and a pair of 'Made in the USA' BILT pants that I threw in the trash. So I went the last 500 miles without rain pants.                                                                                 
You're the man Ray!  What kind of raingear did you use to keep that iron butt from rusting?
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: JazzyzGurl on May 21, 2013, 01:23:38 pm
My Corbin saddle, GOSTR8Rís ergos and full dresser advantages made the 1500+ miles a walk in the park! :raider:

I know they helped ... but only someone with the miles under their belt like you have could call it 'a walk in the park'!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on May 21, 2013, 01:46:12 pm
You're the man Ray!  What kind of raingear did you use to keep that iron butt from rusting?

vaseline!     ;D

I did not need that picture in my head.
;D ;D :rotfl: :rotfl:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on May 21, 2013, 02:26:13 pm
This is gettin good ;D
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on May 21, 2013, 07:22:01 pm
My Corbin saddle, GOSTR8Rís ergos and full dresser advantages made the 1500+ miles a walk in the park! :raider:
I prob could ride the 1500+ as long as it wasnt cold n rainin. Have you ever used the rain proof pants thats in the huntin section n wal mart. I use the gray ones. They are as warm as my leather pants during the winter  Havent went through any rain though with them
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on May 22, 2013, 07:12:21 am
RonKy, thereís all kinds of rain pants in all kinds of stores. The problem is the wind can shred the lighter weight pants, and the others canít keep the water from getting inside while seated at hiway speeds in the wind too. It seems like our butts and front of the lower legs still alway get wet after a long stretch in a steady hard rain at speeds. I have some outstanding fully waterproof boots I bought from Cycle Gear that are also made by BILT. Theyíre incredibly comfy and totally dry, until my pants get so damn wet that the water runs down the leg and into the top of the boots to my socks  >:(. Like any personal item we wear I think that fit and quality imo are as important as design too. No one rain suit brand will work for all riders, so I canít really make any solidly usable suggestions. I donít believe that the most expensive is always better either, so I keep trying until I get a set that works for me. I just got some brand new TourMaster rain pants yesterday at the local Yamaha shop for $5 cuz they had no jacket to match ;D. I only needed pants anyhow so it was well worth the try at that price. Iíll go back this morning and get wifey a set too for the same $5 in medium while they are still available. First time we use them Iíll post a review of how well or poorly they worked for us and our body types.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on May 22, 2013, 09:43:59 am
Wet socks are the worst.  I can deal with getting wet, but if I'm stuck in wet socks for any length of time, I'm miserable.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Sweet Tooth on May 22, 2013, 11:13:52 am
Wet socks are the worst.  I can deal with getting wet, but if I'm stuck in wet socks for any length of time, I'm miserable.
That and sand in your socks can make a ride miserable.Or wet socks and hail.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: dejablu110 on May 23, 2013, 07:37:18 pm
My full rainsuit keeps me totally dry....when I wear it. Only water is the stuff that runs off the back of helmet down my neck. I'm just usually too lazy to always bring it.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: toy on Aug 25, 2013, 06:36:56 pm
https://www.roadstarraider.com/index.php?topic=40178.0 (https://www.roadstarraider.com/index.php?topic=40178.0) good rain boot option.

Also always keep bungee chords and duct tape. I have found MANY incredible uses for duct tape.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: toy on Sep 10, 2013, 10:36:47 am

Also always keep bungee chords and duct tape. I have found MANY incredible uses for duct tape.

I rode up to a sold out weekend long  cycle event like this and they let me in for free. The back was just like the front.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Sep 10, 2013, 11:30:31 am
Sa-weet!!!   :rotfl:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Daytonakid1 on Feb 19, 2014, 06:15:08 am
 Holy sh%t that's a lot of stuff to take on a bike. After my first few long rides I found its best to under pack and I can buy cloths on the rode(great excuse to hit up bike shops) to lessen the load. I've never been on a trip on a raider but I only carry factory tool kit knife elec tape and a small chunk of wire when touring on my Harley. The sun screen and chap stick is a must. Another smart move try to keep face and skin covered on long rides they burn quick. Don't over load your bike and make sure it's worthy of a long ride. Tires might be the most critical thing when going on a long ride. Crap tires in a monsoon suck. It's cool to see that unlike a lot of forums I've been on that some actually ride there bikes.
It's not about what you ride but that you actually ride!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: MrGood on Apr 06, 2015, 01:53:37 pm
Wow, this is all incredible info for a new rider.  Can't thank you enough.  Legend status or the like doesn't quite do it justice, I appreciate all the tips and things learned at your expense!  Ride safe and keep inspiring us all please  O8O 8)
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on Apr 06, 2015, 02:16:49 pm
Gostr8r doesn't get on the forum too much anymore, but I bet he's almost doubled those miles since he started this thread.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: gostr8r on Apr 08, 2015, 06:03:35 am
Good morning ladies and gentlemen. I do agree with Daytonakid1, that you could pack less clothes and buy on the road. I intentionally pack 1 or 2 less shirts cuz I know I'm going to try to get a shirt somewhere on the trip. I don't mind wearing jeans a few extra days too so there's no need to take a pair of jeans for everyday or even every other day. Some good MONKEY BUTT POWDER helps keep the jeans fresher inside on long rides. I like posting pics and on other social media there's not a file size restriction. Not being very tech savy with my dumb fone or my dumb MAC I use other sites more now. This has always been my favorite site tho for Raider Nation contact, support, advice and planning. :thumbs:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: NotaCoverBand on Jun 30, 2015, 06:02:02 am
What is this Monkey Butt Powder you speak of and is it legal and does it work.  Synthetic undies do it for me on day rides.  In the beginning I do believe the chafing was the worst on my summer trips...
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Ares X on Jun 30, 2015, 09:21:01 am
What is this Monkey Butt Powder you speak of and is it legal and does it work.  Synthetic undies do it for me on day rides.  In the beginning I do believe the chafing was the worst on my summer trips...

It's a talc powder type of product and it does help.  Baby powder would probably be similar, but I don't think they're quite the same thing and you don't smell like you just had a diaper change. If you're riding in the heat, especially with humidity, it helps.

I found the female and baby versions at Walgreen's. I think I ended up ordering the Biker version, but since then have seen it locally at a Shoppers.
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Mr. T on Jun 30, 2015, 09:33:33 am
What is this Monkey Butt Powder you speak of and is it legal and does it work.  Synthetic undies do it for me on day rides.  In the beginning I do believe the chafing was the worst on my summer trips...

http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=172067&catid=183877&aid=338666&aparam=172067&kpid=172067&CAWELAID=120142990000056604&CAGPSPN=pla&kpid=172067 
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: NotaCoverBand on Jun 30, 2015, 04:04:23 pm
Nice yeah used baby powder on the last two monther...
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: FireNative on Sep 27, 2018, 08:26:30 am
250,000 miles on a bike? I have been driving for 18yrs and I haven't even put 220,000 miles in trucks yet ;) Just put my first 1200 miles on my new '12 Raven Raider S! Can't wait to pay off some bills and start putting stuff on it!
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: ROADKILL on Sep 27, 2018, 01:29:23 pm
250,000 miles on a bike? I have been driving for 18yrs and I haven't even put 220,000 miles in trucks yet ;) Just put my first 1200 miles on my new '12 Raven Raider S! Can't wait to pay off some bills and start putting stuff on it!
I've been riding since 1965 have no idea how many miles but since losing a leg in 2013 I've done over 35,000 miles  :crutch:
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: Dark Matter on Sep 27, 2018, 10:24:45 pm
250,000 miles on a bike? I have been driving for 18yrs and I haven't even put 220,000 miles in trucks yet ;) Just put my first 1200 miles on my new '12 Raven Raider S! Can't wait to pay off some bills and start putting stuff on it!
I've been riding since 1965 have no idea how many miles but since losing a leg in 2013 I've done over 35,000 miles  :crutch:

I call bullcrap.  Attached is a picture of Roadkill and gostr8r on their brand new bikes some years ago. :)
Title: Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
Post by: A.T. on Sep 28, 2018, 07:01:00 am
 :rotfl: :rotfl:  :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: