Author Topic: Tire tread, please explain...INFORMATION THAT YOU MAY NOT HAVE KNOWN!!!  (Read 373 times)

Badbluraider

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Just got my front Avon AV91 after getting my rear AV92 Tuesday.

Will someone explain to me why it looks the two tires tread pattern runs the opposite way of each other once mounted this way? Or am I seeing this wrong :-\ By the way my old Avon's are still mounted and were running the same way as the new are set up.

I have them sitting the way they are to be mounted and rolling straight ahead.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2020, 07:02:51 pm by Badbluraider »

RoadStarRaider

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    the urban legend

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    Re: Tire tread, please explain...
    « Reply #1 on: May 15, 2020, 06:00:58 am »
    Front tire treads are directed "backwards" to channel water away from the path of the tires DURING A TURN.

    Take the front tire and position the tread in the same direction as the rear tire, then lean it to the left and picture where the water would be directed as you roll down the road. The grooves would push the water ahead and to the inside of the turn, which is exactly where you're trying to go. That would put water in front of both the front tire, and the rear with its slightly smaller turning radius. Not what you want.

    Now do the same exercise with the tire oriented in the recommended direction. The water now gets pushed to the outside of the turn, away from both tires.

    Some people will say that it is for better braking. That is false. it's a common misconception that also plagues the automotive community.
    I'd rather die on a motorcycle than live without one.

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    Badbluraider

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    Re: Tire tread, please explain...
    « Reply #2 on: May 15, 2020, 06:45:42 am »
    Front tire treads are directed "backwards" to channel water away from the path of the tires DURING A TURN.
    Very well I am understanding if you are in a turn it is shedding toward the center which you will not be on the center but toward the outerside.

    Take the front tire and position the tread in the same direction as the rear tire, then lean it to the left and picture where the water would be directed as you roll down the road. The grooves would push the water ahead and to the inside of the turn, which is exactly where you're trying to go. That would put water in front of both the front tire, and the rear with its slightly smaller turning radius. Not what you want.

    Now do the same exercise with the tire oriented in the recommended direction. The water now gets pushed to the outside of the turn, away from both tires.

    Some people will say that it is for better braking. That is false. it's a common misconception that also plagues the automotive community.
    Think I am still missing something. I have them in them recommended direction. So isn't the front tire actually pulling water toward the inside of the tire running straight and in the direction you are actually headed?

    I would just assume both tires would shed water from center toward the outside. Maybe I am just not seeing the physics of this ???

    Just FYI I don't ride in the rain unless caught in it. Usually short runs and if there is a chance of rain it stays in the garage ;D
    « Last Edit: May 15, 2020, 07:13:25 am by Badbluraider »

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      Dirtiegirtie

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      Re: Tire tread, please explain...
      « Reply #3 on: May 15, 2020, 08:40:01 am »
      I never noticed this before you brought it up. Here's an article on the situation at hand:
      http://sgbikerboy.com/2016/12/26/why-do-motorcycle-front-and-rear-tires-have-opposite-tread-patterns/

      ROADKILL

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      Re: Tire tread, please explain...
      « Reply #4 on: May 15, 2020, 09:14:37 am »
      Just got my front Avon AV91 after getting my rear AV92 Tuesday.

      Will someone explain to me why it looks the two tires tread pattern runs the opposite way of each other once mounted this way? Or am I seeing this wrong :-\ By the way my old Avon's are still mounted and were running the same way as the new are set up.

      I have them sitting the way they are to be mounted and rolling straight ahead.
      Check the directional arrows on your old tires that are still on the bike you may find out that one of them is mounted backwards - not the first time that has happened.

      Badbluraider

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      Just got my front Avon AV91 after getting my rear AV92 Tuesday.

      Will someone explain to me why it looks the two tires tread pattern runs the opposite way of each other once mounted this way? Or am I seeing this wrong :-\ By the way my old Avon's are still mounted and were running the same way as the new are set up.

      I have them sitting the way they are to be mounted and rolling straight ahead.
      Check the directional arrows on your old tires that are still on the bike you may find out that one of them is mounted backwards - not the first time that has happened.
      Yes, both arrows are pointed going in the direction of travel. Both on the old ones and the way I have the new ones sitting in the picture. The website above that Dirtiegirtie posted explains it very well and yes believe it or not the front and the back should have opposite tread patterns if mounted correctly.
      Thanks guys :thumbs: :thumbs: :thumbs:

      the urban legend

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      Re: Tire tread, please explain...
      « Reply #6 on: May 15, 2020, 10:36:25 pm »
      Front tire treads are directed "backwards" to channel water away from the path of the tires DURING A TURN.
      Very well I am understanding if you are in a turn it is shedding toward the center which you will not be on the center but toward the outerside.

      Take the front tire and position the tread in the same direction as the rear tire, then lean it to the left and picture where the water would be directed as you roll down the road. The grooves would push the water ahead and to the inside of the turn, which is exactly where you're trying to go. That would put water in front of both the front tire, and the rear with its slightly smaller turning radius. Not what you want.

      Now do the same exercise with the tire oriented in the recommended direction. The water now gets pushed to the outside of the turn, away from both tires.

      Some people will say that it is for better braking. That is false. it's a common misconception that also plagues the automotive community.
      Think I am still missing something. I have them in them recommended direction. So isn't the front tire actually pulling water toward the inside of the tire running straight and in the direction you are actually headed?

      I would just assume both tires would shed water from center toward the outside. Maybe I am just not seeing the physics of this ???

      Just FYI I don't ride in the rain unless caught in it. Usually short runs and if there is a chance of rain it stays in the garage ;D

       It's kind of a compromise thing. Traction isn't as critical when going straight, and the narrow rounded contact patch does a decent job of pushing most of the water aside. But when you're turning, you need all the traction you can get. So pushing the water to the outside of the turn, where you don't want to go, gives you better traction that pushing it back into your path.

      I don't like to ride in the rain either. But sometimes I don't have a choice. I got over 18 hours straight while riding down to SERR in 2018. Not my idea of fun.

      I never noticed this before you brought it up. Here's an article on the situation at hand:
      http://sgbikerboy.com/2016/12/26/why-do-motorcycle-front-and-rear-tires-have-opposite-tread-patterns/


      I knew this would come up.

      First, if the water has so much more momentum than the tire when braking, then it would be propelled forward and not to the sides. For the water to follow the grooves and exit to the sides, it would have to magically stick to the convex surface of the tire and follow the grooves. Not gonna happen. Too many forces at play in this situation, namely momentum and centrifugal force. And speaking of which

      Second, you guessed it, centrifugal force. Any water that is in the grooves gets tossed straight out as the tire spins. For this guy's theory to hold true, the water would have to somehow stay in the grooves as the tire is spinning down the road, and then get expelled to the sides (magically sticking...) as the tire's rotation suddenly slows down. The only time a groove is full of water is when it's IN the water. And no mater how hard you're decelerating, as long as you're moving your tire is always going faster than the water just sitting there on the pavement. So even when braking, your tire is trying to increase the water's momentum. The water doesn't "want to continue in the direction of travel" as he puts it... It wants to stay put, right there, in the puddle.
      I'd rather die on a motorcycle than live without one.

      ,,