Author Topic: Radio install on the accessory plug  (Read 454 times)

Dmr83

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Radio install on the accessory plug
« on: Sep 05, 2021, 10:20:48 am »
Hey guys,
  My gf got me the boss radio for the scoot, and I was wondering if anyone knew if you could wire a radio into the accessory plug under the seat without any issues? Iím not good with electrical stuff so any help would be greatly appreciated. TIA

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    the urban legend

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    Re: Radio install on the accessory plug
    « Reply #1 on: Sep 05, 2021, 02:14:44 pm »
    The power to the accessory plug under the seat is fed through a 3 amp fuse. Unless your radio draws less than 3 amps, you'll just end up blowing the fuse. But at the same time that connector would be ideal because it only has power when the ignition is on.

    What you can do is use the connector to power the control side of a relay, and connect the power side from the battery to the radio. Not sure what system you have, but if your radio has any type of memory (most digital systems do) then that wire would need constant battery power. Wire everything else as per the mounting instructions. And be sure to install the fuse holder as close to the battery as possible.

    This is a quick illustration of how I'd do it using the accessory connector.
    « Last Edit: Sep 05, 2021, 02:17:46 pm by the urban legend »
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    Dmr83

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    Re: Radio install on the accessory plug
    « Reply #2 on: Sep 06, 2021, 09:50:06 am »
    The power to the accessory plug under the seat is fed through a 3 amp fuse. Unless your radio draws less than 3 amps, you'll just end up blowing the fuse. But at the same time that connector would be ideal because it only has power when the ignition is on.

    What you can do is use the connector to power the control side of a relay, and connect the power side from the battery to the radio. Not sure what system you have, but if your radio has any type of memory (most digital systems do) then that wire would need constant battery power. Wire everything else as per the mounting instructions. And be sure to install the fuse holder as close to the battery as possible.

    This is a quick illustration of how I'd do it using the accessory connector.
    So the fuse for the radio is 7.5 amps, would it be possible to swap out the 3 amp fuse on the accessory wire for a 7.5 amp fuse? Or would that be too much for the accessory wire?

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      StrykerBilly

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      Re: Radio install on the accessory plug
      « Reply #3 on: Sep 06, 2021, 11:10:58 am »
      The power to the accessory plug under the seat is fed through a 3 amp fuse. Unless your radio draws less than 3 amps, you'll just end up blowing the fuse. But at the same time that connector would be ideal because it only has power when the ignition is on.

      What you can do is use the connector to power the control side of a relay, and connect the power side from the battery to the radio. Not sure what system you have, but if your radio has any type of memory (most digital systems do) then that wire would need constant battery power. Wire everything else as per the mounting instructions. And be sure to install the fuse holder as close to the battery as possible.

      This is a quick illustration of how I'd do it using the accessory connector.
      So the fuse for the radio is 7.5 amps, would it be possible to swap out the 3 amp fuse on the accessory wire for a 7.5 amp fuse? Or would that be too much for the accessory wire?
      Don't upgrade a fuse.  They are there to protect the wires from overheating and melting.  What Marc posted about the relay is the best way to do it IMO. 
      If you haven't used a 12V relay before it can be a little confusing(especially with the odd numbering of the terminals!!) but there are plenty of articles and videos out there that will make it much simpler.  Plus Marc's diagram is pretty straightforward too!