Author Topic: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement  (Read 322 times)

Ares X

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Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
« on: Jan 11, 2022, 11:11:14 am »
I have barely ridden my Raider in the last year and a half due to COVID. I just don't feel I have anywhere to go that is safe once I get there. I seldom leave the house except for store runs and when I do go out, the Raider is not going to be able to carry everything I need to bring home. Recently my son and I started meeting to play racquetball again, so I thought riding to the rec center where we play would be good.

So yesterday I washed up my Raider up and when I went to start it had some trouble with the key fob.  I had to shake it a number of times and it wasn't great about kicking the ignition on each time. I realized the light on the fob was barely being lit if at all, so I assumed it needed new batteries. Well, you want to make sure you install the batteries in the correct direction because I did not and I was only getting the fob to work intermittently. These are the flat CR2032 batteries. They need to be installed with both + sides on the inside. I installed + up on both, so only one was correct, so I think I was only getting half the volts.

This morning I got on DGD's website and looked at the troubleshooting section and they mention that the batteries need to have 3.0 volts. Even just 2.9 is not good. I tested them with a meter and one was about 1.9 and the other was about 2.1. These were brand new batteries with tape on the - side, but I think installing them incorrectly and leaving them overnight may have drained them. So I took two more batteries out of the same package and they were reading well above 3 volts, so I put them in (correctly oriented this time) and I noticed the LED was nice and bright when I pushed the button. I went downstairs to check my bike and it powered right up.

Being negligent and aging eye sight cost me two batteries and a lot of frustration.

RoadStarRaider

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    Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
    « Reply #1 on: Jan 11, 2022, 09:32:08 pm »
    At least you figured it out.   Thinking about getting the DGD -  any other issues encountered?

    Ares X

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    Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
    « Reply #2 on: Jan 12, 2022, 09:10:41 am »
    At least you figured it out.   Thinking about getting the DGD -  any other issues encountered?

    Just the occasional battery drain if you have it in active mode and do not ride often.  If that's the case you may want to use passive mode or just keep it on a battery tender when not in use.

    I love my DGD. It's one of my favorite upgrades.

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      A.T.

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      Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
      « Reply #3 on: Jan 12, 2022, 05:46:47 pm »
      Cheers - thanks

      ROADKILL

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      Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
      « Reply #4 on: Jan 12, 2022, 07:49:50 pm »
      At least you figured it out.   Thinking about getting the DGD -  any other issues encountered?

      Just the occasional battery drain if you have it in active mode and do not ride often.  If that's the case you may want to use passive mode or just keep it on a battery tender when not in use.

      I love my DGD. It's one of my favorite upgrades.
      Wouldn't you need to change the battery in the fob regardless of how much you ride  :shrug: :shrug: :shrug:

      Ares X

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      Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
      « Reply #5 on: Jan 13, 2022, 04:13:44 pm »
      At least you figured it out.   Thinking about getting the DGD -  any other issues encountered?

      Just the occasional battery drain if you have it in active mode and do not ride often.  If that's the case you may want to use passive mode or just keep it on a battery tender when not in use.

      I love my DGD. It's one of my favorite upgrades.
      Wouldn't you need to change the battery in the fob regardless of how much you ride  :shrug: :shrug: :shrug:

      Not fob battery drain.  Raider batter drain. 

      ctgjerts

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      Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
      « Reply #6 on: Jan 15, 2022, 08:12:29 pm »
      Thanks for the heads up.  I have one of these and should probably look into replacing the batteries over the winter.  So they're fresh for the spring.  Wouldn't have thought of it without your post.

      Sgt Fury

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      Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
      « Reply #7 on: Jan 16, 2022, 11:28:45 am »
      My war story:  I would highly recommend that you carry a spare battery in your bike bag or even your car glovebox.  I've learned the hard way that these lithium button batteries don't necessarily give you a warning when they get too low, especially in the cold---and what truly is "too low" for your device.  I have had 2032/2025's etc read 3.0-3.1 volts on my good Fluke meter (perhaps 3.3 when new, as I always check them since they're Chinese) and they weren't good enough for my cars to sense the FOB and sometimes even if placing right by the dash push-to-start button.  Now that scared me, even if rare.  My older non-PTS ignition cars with FOBs used to give a clue as to the distance to work door locks, etc decreasing over time as the battery aged, but push-to-start ignition cars seem less forgiving (having owned three of this type now).  Granted, these new FOBs do a lot more things regarding security, etc. I also keep those spare batteries rotated and fresh since 2032's fit a lot of my household gizmos.  A 3-volt battery reading in the high 2+ volts is going to cause you grief at the most inopportune time!  The dollar store sells twin packs or singles.  My replacing what looked to be a solid 3.0-3.1 volt battery fixed my FOB problems EVERY time.  Go figure....    O8O 
      « Last Edit: Jan 16, 2022, 11:43:05 am by Sgt Fury »


      There's no substitute for cubic inches and a good engine management system!   Hmmm, well maybe a blower, NOS or turbo....

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      Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
      « Reply #8 on: Jan 16, 2022, 06:17:46 pm »
      My war story:  I would highly recommend that you carry a spare battery in your bike bag or even your car glovebox.  I've learned the hard way that these lithium button batteries don't necessarily give you a warning when they get too low, especially in the cold---and what truly is "too low" for your device.  I have had 2032/2025's etc read 3.0-3.1 volts on my good Fluke meter (perhaps 3.3 when new, as I always check them since they're Chinese) and they weren't good enough for my cars to sense the FOB and sometimes even if placing right by the dash push-to-start button.  Now that scared me, even if rare.  My older non-PTS ignition cars with FOBs used to give a clue as to the distance to work door locks, etc decreasing over time as the battery aged, but push-to-start ignition cars seem less forgiving (having owned three of this type now).  Granted, these new FOBs do a lot more things regarding security, etc. I also keep those spare batteries rotated and fresh since 2032's fit a lot of my household gizmos.  A 3-volt battery reading in the high 2+ volts is going to cause you grief at the most inopportune time!  The dollar store sells twin packs or singles.  My replacing what looked to be a solid 3.0-3.1 volt battery fixed my FOB problems EVERY time.  Go figure....    O8O

      I know what you mean about cheap batteries. I'm a mechanic at a car dealership, and we get key fob complaints all the time from customers who claimed to have replaced the battery with a good one (almost all our fobs use the 2032 size). Every time it's a cheap dollar store battery. We replace it with one from the manufacturer (in dealership packaging. Usually Panasonic, but I've seen Duracell a few times) and it always fixes the problem. The cheap batteries put out 3 volts when you test them, but they can't handle the load needed to make the fob work. As they say: You get what you pay for.
      I'd rather die on a motorcycle than live without one.

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      Re: Digital Guard Dawg Key Fob battery replacement
      « Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 02:54:31 pm »
      My war story:  I would highly recommend that you carry a spare battery in your bike bag or even your car glovebox.  I've learned the hard way that these lithium button batteries don't necessarily give you a warning when they get too low, especially in the cold---and what truly is "too low" for your device.  I have had 2032/2025's etc read 3.0-3.1 volts on my good Fluke meter (perhaps 3.3 when new, as I always check them since they're Chinese) and they weren't good enough for my cars to sense the FOB and sometimes even if placing right by the dash push-to-start button.  Now that scared me, even if rare.  My older non-PTS ignition cars with FOBs used to give a clue as to the distance to work door locks, etc decreasing over time as the battery aged, but push-to-start ignition cars seem less forgiving (having owned three of this type now).  Granted, these new FOBs do a lot more things regarding security, etc. I also keep those spare batteries rotated and fresh since 2032's fit a lot of my household gizmos.  A 3-volt battery reading in the high 2+ volts is going to cause you grief at the most inopportune time!  The dollar store sells twin packs or singles.  My replacing what looked to be a solid 3.0-3.1 volt battery fixed my FOB problems EVERY time.  Go figure....    O8O

      I know what you mean about cheap batteries. I'm a mechanic at a car dealership, and we get key fob complaints all the time from customers who claimed to have replaced the battery with a good one (almost all our fobs use the 2032 size). Every time it's a cheap dollar store battery. We replace it with one from the manufacturer (in dealership packaging. Usually Panasonic, but I've seen Duracell a few times) and it always fixes the problem. The cheap batteries put out 3 volts when you test them, but they can't handle the load needed to make the fob work. As they say: You get what you pay for.

      I totally agree on the cheap, although I've been guilty of it at times.  Even if a battery has good voltage, 3.3 VDC in the case of the 2032s, it doesn't mean it has the milliamphours to send a good FOB signal.  Just like a car battery failing a load test.  Been fooled a few times about that years ago until I bought my own tester.  I change out the FOB battery even if it looks good (and even if a dealership has a FOB RF detector) and like you said, the problem is usually solved--every time!  I didn't mention it before, but I generally change out all my FOB batteries annually to avoid issues for me or the wife when I don't have the time or coin to carefully pry open a FOB.  I repurpose the "used" button batteries in other unimportant crap around the house until they die.  I'm too old and smarter than to get stranded any more than I have over the previous decades.  Most of the time it has been the darn big car battery that gave me no warning--in the heat no less.  LOL    :blah: :scooter:      (Now I carry a lithium jump box, which I've been told, has the capability of burning down my house or vehicle!!)     :wtf:
      « Last Edit: Yesterday at 03:00:15 pm by Sgt Fury »


      There's no substitute for cubic inches and a good engine management system!   Hmmm, well maybe a blower, NOS or turbo....