Author Topic: Fuel pump  (Read 61763 times)

A.T.

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Re: Fuel pump
« Reply #330 on: Feb 19, 2019, 07:55:05 pm »
Well Marc - that just sux.

My .02:  It's better to replace the pump assembly; repairs only delay the inevitable   Introducing foreign materials that are submerged in fuel is asking for trouble.  Fiberglass isn't an option when using ethanol fuel, and most bonding materials will dissolve in petrol.   Dissimilar metals in fuel is probably unwise - God knows what electrical capacitance issues may come into play if not bonded - one spark and.... 

Replacement is not a difficult job and can be done in less than 90 mins by someone who is mechanically competent possessing the needed tools.

One good thing is this pump is somewhat a universal Yamaha item - it's also used with Yamaha outboards (not keyboards  ;D).

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    Phaedrus

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    Re: Fuel pump
    « Reply #331 on: Feb 20, 2019, 08:59:32 am »
    Fiberglass isn't an option when using ethanol fuel, and most bonding materials will dissolve in petrol.   Dissimilar metals in fuel is probably unwise - God knows what electrical capacitance issues may come into play if not bonded - one spark and.... 
    :popcorn:

    ROADKILL

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    Re: Fuel pump
    « Reply #332 on: Feb 20, 2019, 09:48:28 am »
    I think that the only way that you could repair the crack that would last for a while would be on the inside which would be a real PITA.

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      StrykerBilly

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #333 on: Feb 20, 2019, 10:14:38 am »
      I have a fix for this issue. It doesn't involve patching up anything. I wasn't able to test it out on the road before winter came,but it works perfectly in the shed.

      On January 2nd,I finished creating a full how-to write up with pictures and everything. I was about to post it but my 37 day old HP PC decided to crap out big time. Among other issues,the document was impossible to open,I couldn't move it to any other folder,creating a backup copy was impossible... I soon realized that the same illness afflicted my pictures and my music. Every day for weeks I tried to move the document to an external storage device. I also tried opening it,hoping that maybe I could take screenshots and save those somehow.  One time I clicked on the document and let the PC run while I was away. 26 hours later it was still working on it. I finally gave in and called tech support. First they tried a few tests but everything was normal. Then they reset my PC to factory condition...deleting all of my files in the process. And you know what? The damn PC still ran like crap. I had a good 30 hours of work in that How-to;writing,cropping and adding text to pictures,putting everything together so it was clear and made sense,proof reading,modifying... I just haven't had the heart to do it all over again.

       The PC is currently at the HP service center. It's been a week and I haven't heard back from them yet. Honestly,I don't even want to see it anymore. Unfortunately warranty policy states that they will fix it and send it back. But let me tell you,if I hadn't coughed up $800 for the damn thing I'd be making one of those "object VS 20 ton press" videos as soon as I got it back.
         :rant:

      Sadly most of the mfg's riddle the laptops with so much bloatware that they are practically useless.  Varies from one to the other and year top year so you just have to look when you get it and see if just removing their programs fixes things.  If not, then I do a clean reload of Windows.  It's extra work for sure but the machines run much better.

      I also ALWAYS partition the hard drive(better yet a SSD as they are now inexpensive) to have a C and D partition.  D is for data and where all of that goes.  Later on if Windows takes a crap you can reload to the C partition and not affect your data.  And goes without saying to backup the data partition regularly.  I use free software that runs every other night and backs up to our NAS device.  You could also use the cloud but that can get a little costly if you have a lot of data.

      HP also has a nasty habit of white listing things like wifi cards in the bios.  What that means is you can only use theirs and you cannot say upgrade to wireless AC.  Planned obsolesce I guess...  Plus their customer service blows but in fairness most do.

      My daughters college laptop was/is terrible but she was years behind on applying updates.  Not sure how she managed that but she did.  Took days for it to update on a speedy hard wired connection but now that is good.  Wifi, though is terrible.  Research new cards since Dell does not white list.  Worth trying for say $40 and time because her teacher laptop is locked down so you cannot add any programs or even a font for a project :(
      Her old laptop will only perform like the 2014 machine that it is but sure beats shelling out $800 if you don't have too!  Eventually they all need to be replaced but some small changes can eek out an extra 3-4 years if you don't need it to be super snappy.  More $$'s to spend on the motorcycle!!

      Ares X

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #334 on: Feb 20, 2019, 12:14:32 pm »
      Well Marc - that just sux.

      My .02:  It's better to replace the pump assembly; repairs only delay the inevitable   Introducing foreign materials that are submerged in fuel is asking for trouble.  Fiberglass isn't an option when using ethanol fuel, and most bonding materials will dissolve in petrol.   Dissimilar metals in fuel is probably unwise - God knows what electrical capacitance issues may come into play if not bonded - one spark and.... 

      Replacement is not a difficult job and can be done in less than 90 mins by someone who is mechanically competent possessing the needed tools.

      One good thing is this pump is somewhat a universal Yamaha item - it's also used with Yamaha outboards (not keyboards  ;D).

      I agree about replacing being the better way to go.  I replaced it twice on my first Raider. Both at about 30,000 miles of use. Luckily Yamaha picked up the bill on the second one.

      the urban legend

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #335 on: Feb 20, 2019, 07:09:05 pm »
      --First ,I didn't use any material that wasn't designed for gasoline use. I've been looking into this for a while. My housing wasn't cracked,but I wanted to do something for all the victims out there. And it'll probably happen to me someday anyway,so might as well get a jump on it. I got a cracked housing from fellow forum member Tice like 3 years ago and I've been working on a viable solution since then. But nothing fit until now.
      --Second,like I said earlier I didn't patch anything. I actually cut the housing up,leaving only what I needed. Actually,I left more than I needed just to guarantee structural integrity.
      --Third,this mod basically takes the housing out of the equation. If it works as intended,that's one less problem area on an already very reliable motorcycle.

      I wanted to post the how-to in January,even untested out on the road,in case somebody needed it during winter.But now I'm thinking I should ride with it all summer and post only next fall or winter. Your skepticism has fueled my procrastination  ;)
      I'd rather die on a motorcycle than live without one.

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      A.T.

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #336 on: Feb 20, 2019, 07:56:50 pm »
      --First ,I didn't use any material that wasn't designed for gasoline use. I've been looking into this for a while. My housing wasn't cracked,but I wanted to do something for all the victims out there. And it'll probably happen to me someday anyway,so might as well get a jump on it. I got a cracked housing from fellow forum member Tice like 3 years ago and I've been working on a viable solution since then. But nothing fit until now.
      --Second,like I said earlier I didn't patch anything. I actually cut the housing up,leaving only what I needed. Actually,I left more than I needed just to guarantee structural integrity.
      --Third,this mod basically takes the housing out of the equation. If it works as intended,that's one less problem area on an already very reliable motorcycle.

      I wanted to post the how-to in January,even untested out on the road,in case somebody needed it during winter.But now I'm thinking I should ride with it all summer and post only next fall or winter. Your skepticism has fueled my procrastination  ;)

       ;D....Marc - we wouldn't expect anything less from you when a challenge arises.  Skepticism?  Never when you're involved.   

      I have two extra pumps assemblies in my garage - one is my original cracked pump while the other is a used pump I picked up along the way as a back-up.  Definitely would want to see your solution, maybe try it out on my bad pump. 

      On planes with jet fuel we used a two-part sealant called 899-B1/2 (or B2) for sealing fuel tanks.  That stuff worked with JP8 (kerosine) - not sure if it would hold up to ethanol petrol. 
      « Last Edit: Feb 21, 2019, 06:02:18 am by A.T. »

      twiztted

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #337 on: May 22, 2019, 07:55:45 pm »
      I just pulled my fuel pump out and have the notorious crack!  Is there anyway to fix or repair the pump at a resonable cost?  $400+ is crazy expensive and that kind of cost hurts bad!  Is there another pump that can be used that doesnt have the housing crack issue? I've seen other "replacement pumps" for far less but I'm not a mechanic and I'm not sure if they would work. Any help would be hugley appreciated

      the urban legend

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #338 on: May 22, 2019, 08:18:54 pm »
      I just pulled my fuel pump out and have the notorious crack!  Is there anyway to fix or repair the pump at a resonable cost?  $400+ is crazy expensive and that kind of cost hurts bad!  Is there another pump that can be used that doesnt have the housing crack issue? I've seen other "replacement pumps" for far less but I'm not a mechanic and I'm not sure if they would work. Any help would be hugley appreciated

      The problem with replacing the pump is that you're still stuck with the cracked housing. Don't waste your money on a pump if the problem is the housing. Even a brand new aftermarket pump won't produce the required pressure if the housing leaks.

      My suggestion if you can't throw money at a new pump/housing assembly: try to plastic weld it. At this point you have nothing to lose. Some people have gotten a few thousand miles out of a welded housing before the crack reappeared. In the meantime,I might get the time (and willpower) to redo my pump housing mod how-to. I've been consistently working 10-12 hour days for the last few months so time is at a premium for me right now.

      Another suggestion: try sending woodog a PM. Apparently he has a good price on new housings.
      I'd rather die on a motorcycle than live without one.

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      sundancer87

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #339 on: May 26, 2019, 06:38:58 pm »
      I don't have this problem yet but I have been reading the threads about the possible repairs and replacement cost. 
      There are inline fuel pumps capable of delivering high pressure for EFI engines, up to 1200 BHP.  Why couldn't one just replace the 500 dollar pump with a 30 dollar pump.  The aforementioned pump does not need to be submerged and comes with normal fittings.
      I haven't had the Raider's tank off but I'm sure a few modifications could be made and the pump located to a suitable place and would service the engine just fine.  If they can work in automobiles I don't see why they won't work on a Raider.  As an example; https://www.ebay.com/itm/Inline-High-Pressure-Fuel-Pump-Universal-Replacement-Bosch-0580464070-MegaSquirt-/332097664392?_trksid=p2349526.m4383.l4275.c10#viTabs_0

      Coldfinger

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      Re: Fuel pump
      « Reply #340 on: Jun 11, 2019, 01:46:24 pm »
      I would apply plastic bonder to the crack, then wrap the housing using fiber fix. 

      I have some JB Weld Plastic Bonder which They recommended for such repairs and Fiber Fix told me their product is fuel resistant but untested in submersion. 

      If anyone is willing to consider this method, I would be glad to apply plastic bonder to some plastic and place the piece in 10% ethanol and do the same in non-ethanol to get a rough idea if it would even be a consideration. 

      Someone should do the same with Fiber Fix.   I think it is like $20 for some of that and it is one time use?  Maybe fiber fix has tested their product in fuel since I spoke with them.  Might be worth a call.