Author Topic: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.  (Read 51558 times)

gostr8r

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What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
« on: Mar 09, 2010, 09:36:50 pm »
here ya go. I spent 2 hours writing this and added 2 photos and then it wouldn't posts.  :witsend: I'll try again tomorrow.
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2010, 04:51:18 am by gostr8r »
I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,   

RoadStarRaider

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    gman

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    Re: Long distance riding tips.
    « Reply #1 on: Mar 09, 2010, 10:35:35 pm »
    That has happened to me too, real bummer.

    RedStar Raider

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    Re: Long distance riding tips.
    « Reply #2 on: Mar 09, 2010, 10:40:19 pm »
    here ya go. I spent 2 hours writing this and added 2 photos and then it wouldn't posts.  :witsend: I'll try again tomorrow.

    What a bummer!! :'(
    RedStar Raider             FOUR WHEELS MOVE YOUR BODY, TWO WHEELS MOVE YOUR SOUL.

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      seventhLetter

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      Re: Long distance riding tips.
      « Reply #3 on: Mar 09, 2010, 10:47:59 pm »
      Sorry about that Ray. Looking forward to your tips brother!
      RoxieRaider, SeventhLetter, G, "hey you", I answer to just about anything.

      LostDog

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      Re: Long distance riding tips.
      « Reply #4 on: Mar 09, 2010, 11:19:42 pm »
      Man, I can relate to that chit!

      EraserX33

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      Re: Long distance riding tips.
      « Reply #5 on: Mar 10, 2010, 12:11:20 am »
      Whenever I'm writing a long post (rarely if ever) I tend to write it in MS Word and then copy and paste it in.  It viods that problem.  Plus you can save it and come back to it later if you need to.

      Looking forward to reading your tips Ray.

      Darrell
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      LostDog

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      Re: Long distance riding tips.
      « Reply #6 on: Mar 10, 2010, 01:59:23 am »
      When I think of it  :rolleyes:, I copy it to my clipboard then try to post (or send if it's an email). If anything goes wrong I can just open another and paste it and try again.

      Rick Busbea

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      Re: Long distance riding tips.
      « Reply #7 on: Mar 10, 2010, 02:16:17 am »
      Definitely looking forward to the tips gostr8r. I'm making a trip from LA to KC mid-June and am looking for all the advice I can get. cornfed made up a nice packing list, but am always looking for more input.  :raider:

      gostr8r

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      Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
      « Reply #8 on: Mar 10, 2010, 04:44:39 am »
      Prep and packing are obviously related to where [away from civilization and gas, unfamiliar roads, etc], how far and  when you go [climate extremes] and if you ride alone or 2 up. For this post I wanted to cover 2 up cross country journey's. I obviously spent the money on the Corbin touring kit and a T bag, so use what use can of this and disregard the rest of my rant. In the planning stages seek feedback from others that have gone before you to the same places and in the same season. Take the 'common goods ands bad points' that they all give and apply them accordingly. Call or search online for up to date road conditions such as closures and repairs. Have your sled serviced, use lock tight on the fasteners and start with good rubber! Notify the bank or credit card companies so they don't refuse your purchases or embarrass you at a gas station. Carry a gas can unless your sure of the stops and supply. Let a friend know of your ETA's each day by phone, just in the extreme case you leave the rode and end up in a ditch or someplace that isn't visible from the highway. Minimize night riding, or at least wear highly reflective vests. Weather permitting, get early starts, and experience high altitude sunrises and sunsets. Take advantage of National Park Passes, frequent flier miles and motel promos. Consider a LoJack or some anti theft equipment. Check your tires, axle nuts, lights and luggage stability regularly. Cruise controls, hi-way pegs, back support and free ballin' body powders are a must for the long rides. Keep your eyes well protected and moving back and forth across the road [stop or let the passenger do the picture taking] and ride like you're invisible [figure that they don't see you at all]. Stay way back from, or ahead of the big rigs to avoid running the reds lights behind them and also to avoid their recaps and rock slinging at your face. Stay within 10 mph of the postedlimits, Kojack and his Kodack love tourists! Hydrate, stretch and snack at gas stops. Use 'both' hand and electric turn signals. Cover the longest distances early on and gradually get shorter for a couple days before going long again. Get business or post cards from the places that you would recommend to others. Meet and greet the locals and patronize their diners. Promote the Raider Rally and the RSR Forum with drop cards and reach out to your other members on the road. Take road sign photos of obscure turns into great places, and make a nightly video diary, all to help you stay focused on what you did, how you felt and how you got there. When you get stressed out or upset remember that you could also be unemployed, homeless and on foot, but instead your in the wind on a Raider! Now for packing, I have some suggestions too. Remember your docs', DL, AAA, AARP, credit cards that say check ID [also carry an expired one to give the thug that robs you at gun point], plus insurance and registration cards. Both of you have cell phones at all times. Take a tank bag or at least a mid size gym bag, or book bag,for the passengers lap. Here I pack the easy access items: a kick stand plate, camera batteries, snacks, water, sunblock, chap stick, bug spray, maps, hand towel [for a wet seat], sani-wipes or hand gel, RSR drop cards and a pen, octane booster, flashlight, scarfs, gloves, glasses, camera batteries, a multi-tool and even a roll of toilet paper! Under a bungie net I keep rain suits [which can be used in place of bulkier jackets and chaps], Spider Feet [for the boots] and either a half bike cover or a large contractors clean up bag to cover the luggage in the rain. In a removable pack [for hauling into the motel room] I have the clothes [4 pair of socks, 3 t-shirts at the most, a dress shirt, 2 jeans, her pj's, flip flops, walking shoes, bathing suit, and do laundry on the 4th day] plus your med's and vitamins, all the chargers, USB and AVI cables, make-up and shave kits. On the bike I keep the tool kit bagged up with offset screw drivers, a small set of allen's, combo wrenches and 3/8th drive sockets, knife, retractable mechanical fingers, mirror and magnet, electrical needle nose and vise grip pliers and a wide jaw 6" crescent. In a repair bag kit I have a small assortment of zip ties, fuses, bulbs, connectors, hose clamps, a lighter and shrink tube, Locktite, a spark plug, tire repair kit and a DC operated mini air compressor or Fix-a-flat, plus teflon, electrical and duct tapes. and lastly I have a cleaning kit with bronze wool, ammonia free windex [closed up], micro fiber clothes, a good paste wax, cotton gloves, hand wipes and best of all the throw away black cotton rags from my Harley shirts after I cut off the inked in areas. I know this is along read, but if it helps any one at all pass it on.
      « Last Edit: Mar 10, 2010, 04:50:22 am by gostr8r »
      I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,   

      dreadly

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      Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
      « Reply #9 on: Mar 10, 2010, 06:48:18 am »
      From someone that has ridden as many miles as you, it's golden advise!

      All of it good. The one thing I would probably never have thought of is the octane boost, and I can see where it would come in handy. Even here last year on a ride, I had to put in $5 of regular to get me to the next 'real' gas station.

      Thanks Ray

      Mr. T

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      Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
      « Reply #10 on: Mar 10, 2010, 08:23:21 am »
      Some great advice... thanks.  I'm sure I'll be looking this up again prior to my iron butt ride to see the shuttle launch.

        July 2009

      If we're not supposed to eat animals ... how come they're made out of meat?  ;D

      Harley... the art of turning gas into noise without all that pesky horsepower.  ;D

      Defender Bob

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      Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
      « Reply #11 on: Mar 10, 2010, 08:40:07 am »
      Thats some great info!

      On a side note, 250,000 miles is a $hit load of miles!
      "Sometimes when I reflect on all the beer I drink, I feel ashamed. Then I look into the glass and think about the workers in the brewery and all of their hopes and dreams. If I didn't drink this beer, they might be out of work and their dreams would be shattered. I think, "It is better to drink this beer and let their dreams come true than be selfish and worry about my liver." - Babe Ruth

      Rick Busbea

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      Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
      « Reply #12 on: Mar 10, 2010, 11:21:38 am »
      Thanks gostr8r, some good info in here, along with stuff I didn't even consider. Great help for my upcoming 4K trip!!!

      RedStar Raider

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      Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
      « Reply #13 on: Mar 10, 2010, 11:40:31 am »
      Thanx Ray!!! You will have made a difference in a lot of members travels, this year, and into the future. I will be using this list for my June California trip. It will be very cool when you get here in July, and to see it first hand. Probably see how I should have packed properly.  ;D ;D ;D Thanx again, my FRIEND!


      RSR
      RedStar Raider             FOUR WHEELS MOVE YOUR BODY, TWO WHEELS MOVE YOUR SOUL.

      gostr8r

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      Re: What I've learned in 250,000 miles of riding motorcycles.
      « Reply #14 on: Mar 10, 2010, 05:07:41 pm »
      I would have added more info but Kim was harassing me to call it a night. I have a lot more and as a rider I evolve and learn from others too. I've learned a great deal reading posts by our other members like TRaiderJohn, and many others that are so technically sharp and well read. I'll share what I've learned and some of that is from my friends! Got a few honey do's tonight so maybe I'll add some more stuff tomorrow.
      Thanx Ray!!! You will have made a difference in a lot of members travels, this year, and into the future. I will be using this list for my June California trip. It will be very cool when you get here in July, and to see it first hand. Probably see how I should have packed properly.  ;D ;D ;D Thanx again, my FRIEND!


      RSR
      I go too far and too fast to ride a Harley! If you see my bike on a trailer call 911. A Corbin fairing, bags, heated seat, V-Rail and back rest, PC3, PR Air Kit, V&H BR, 5" Chopper's Surplus Z Bars, DWG sound system, Indian front fender, mucho Kuryakyn and Yammy bling,