Author Topic: Rear axle extension tool.  (Read 6848 times)

RangerRick

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Re: Rear axle extension tool.
« Reply #15 on: Apr 30, 2017, 08:04:10 pm »
Just wondering if anyone here actually torques the rear axle nut to 110 ft/lbs. I have a quality torque wrench, and 80 ft/lbs almost seems to much. I have never and will never tighten it to 110 ft/lbs, or even 100 ft/lbs. Never had an issue with the nut backing off.

I did the one and only time I adjusted my belt, now the dealer does it when my rear tire is replaced.
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    dukedomain

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    Re: Rear axle extension tool.
    « Reply #16 on: May 01, 2017, 08:10:14 am »
    Yep...same here.  110 ft. lbs. every time.

    Tight nuts!

    CHROMINATOR

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    Re: Rear axle extension tool.
    « Reply #17 on: May 02, 2017, 02:05:24 pm »

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      Coldfinger

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      Re: Rear axle extension tool.
      « Reply #18 on: Jan 16, 2018, 07:08:58 pm »
      I have always used the “good-n-tight” method without a problem.  You want to be able to remove the nut, if for some reason you have to, while traveling.   Been doing it this way for over 40 years.  Most often on my Kaw Concours which was 30 years old with 80,000 miles and approx 10 tire changes, but it was a shaftie.  I have also owned dirt bikes my whole life amd no issues there either. 

      marcelmot

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      Re: Rear axle extension tool.
      « Reply #19 on: Feb 03, 2018, 01:15:13 am »
      Just as usefull info :
      I have the LAChoppers exhausts, no issue for me when removing the rear axle nut.
      But, my torque wrench range is 19 - 110 Nm (14 - 81 Ft-lb), and sometimes I need more torque (rear axle nut, steering stem bolt ...), so I have made an simple extension tool, you need only to cut and a weld together the parts.
      After that, I have "calibrated" the wrench + extension, using a bigger range torque wrench, so I know exactly what torque I have at the end of extension => the torque value, measured at the end of extension is about 50% bigger than the value set on the wrench. Of course, this depends on the length of the extension.
      « Last Edit: Feb 03, 2018, 01:23:25 am by marcelmot »
      My life it's an endless fight against maturity.
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      fingertight

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      Re: Rear axle extension tool.
      « Reply #20 on: Feb 09, 2018, 11:36:45 am »
      Just as usefull info :
      I have the LAChoppers exhausts, no issue for me when removing the rear axle nut.
      But, my torque wrench range is 19 - 110 Nm (14 - 81 Ft-lb), and sometimes I need more torque (rear axle nut, steering stem bolt ...), so I have made an simple extension tool, you need only to cut and a weld together the parts.
      After that, I have "calibrated" the wrench + extension, using a bigger range torque wrench, so I know exactly what torque I have at the end of extension => the torque value, measured at the end of extension is about 50% bigger than the value set on the wrench. Of course, this depends on the length of the extension.

      IMHO, "about" isn't acceptable when it comes to the torque value.  If you are off by a few pounds in either direction that could cause a major issue.  Maybe you already know this but for others that may not, here's the formula to know exactly what the torque setting is.

      This is an old thread so incase you haven't looked at the first few posts.

      M1 = M2 x L1 / L2

      M1 is the torque setting of the wrench
      M2 is the actual required torque applied to the nut
      L1 is the normal length of the wrench measured from the center of the handle to the center of the socket
      L2 is the extended length of the wrench measured from the center of the handle to the center of the extended socket

      Plug in M2, L1 and L2 use the math you learned in 6th grade and you get the correct setting on the wrench.  No guess work and no "about".  8)




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      Re: Rear axle extension tool.
      « Reply #21 on: Feb 09, 2018, 11:57:52 am »
      I have always used the “good-n-tight” method without a problem.  You want to be able to remove the nut, if for some reason you have to, while traveling.   Been doing it this way for over 40 years.  Most often on my Kaw Concours which was 30 years old with 80,000 miles and approx 10 tire changes, but it was a shaftie.  I have also owned dirt bikes my whole life amd no issues there either.
      I thought that was German for virgin

      marcelmot

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      Re: Rear axle extension tool.
      « Reply #22 on: Feb 09, 2018, 12:16:58 pm »
      Just as usefull info :
      I have the LAChoppers exhausts, no issue for me when removing the rear axle nut.
      But, my torque wrench range is 19 - 110 Nm (14 - 81 Ft-lb), and sometimes I need more torque (rear axle nut, steering stem bolt ...), so I have made an simple extension tool, you need only to cut and a weld together the parts.
      After that, I have "calibrated" the wrench + extension, using a bigger range torque wrench, so I know exactly what torque I have at the end of extension => the torque value, measured at the end of extension is about 50% bigger than the value set on the wrench. Of course, this depends on the length of the extension.


      IMHO, "about" isn't acceptable when it comes to the torque value.  If you are off by a few pounds in either direction that could cause a major issue.  Maybe you already know this but for others that may not, here's the formula to know exactly what the torque setting is.

      This is an old thread so incase you haven't looked at the first few posts.

      M1 = M2 x L1 / L2

      M1 is the torque setting of the wrench
      M2 is the actual required torque applied to the nut
      L1 is the normal length of the wrench measured from the center of the handle to the center of the socket
      L2 is the extended length of the wrench measured from the center of the handle to the center of the extended socket

      Plug in M2, L1 and L2 use the math you learned in 6th grade and you get the correct setting on the wrench.  No guess work and no "about".  8)

      No, it's not about, I'm not an "about" men, and if somebody understood "about", I'm sorry, probably is my fault because of language ...

      To come back, I know EXACTLY what the torque value is at the end of my tool extension, because, as I  wrote in my 1st email, I have checked it with a bigger wrench (a calibrated one, yearly ..).This is more precisely than the formula from the net. I know about the formula, is not a big deal, you just need to google it.
      My life it's an endless fight against maturity.
      "You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist."

      lipps1948

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      Re: Rear axle extension tool.
      « Reply #23 on: Apr 21, 2018, 10:32:24 am »
      Lol, Before trading in my Roadstar for the Raider read the same argument over on their forum same 110 pounds torque.
      Ernest (Pete) Lipps