Author Topic: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs  (Read 21735 times)

RangerRick

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Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
« Reply #30 on: Aug 15, 2013, 07:50:02 am »
It would also work great for removing bearings, as long as they are inside a housing such as the wheel bearings, thanks for the post cpayne13  ;)
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    Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
    « Reply #31 on: Aug 15, 2013, 10:04:25 am »
    THIS is a lifesaver! Works good as heat, but does not damage plastics or refinished surfaces.
    there are cheaper alternatives than loctite, btw...



    Good to know.  Thanks!

    SilverStar

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    Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
    « Reply #32 on: Oct 03, 2013, 09:06:12 pm »
    Another thing to consider is to know your material.  For example,  when removing plugs from aluminum heads the engine should be cold.  Every time you remove bolts or plugs from hot aluminum there's a chance the aluminum will adhere to the steel and strip no matter how careful you are.  Some alloys are more susceptible than others, but if at all possible, pull plugs cold.  Then use anti-seize to reassemble.
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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #33 on: Oct 04, 2013, 09:44:22 am »
      Another thing to consider is to know your material.  For example,  when removing plugs from aluminum heads the engine should be cold.  Every time you remove bolts or plugs from hot aluminum there's a chance the aluminum will adhere to the steel and strip no matter how careful you are.  Some alloys are more susceptible than others, but if at all possible, pull plugs cold.  Then use anti-seize to reassemble.

      I wouldn't want to change plugs on a hot engine.

      MaddSampson

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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #34 on: Oct 15, 2013, 06:38:25 pm »
      Yes anti-seize anywhere its hot and steel meets aluminum is a must. also PB is amazing it is freeing up many frozen parts on this 81 xs650 project motor that i am starting for a winter project of mine. I will def have to check out that freeze and release for my next bearing job. 

      G2G113

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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #35 on: Jan 31, 2015, 01:59:12 am »
      Always anti-seize any dissimilar metal.  Dissimilar metals and alloys have different electrode potentials, and when two or more come into contact with each other they create corrosion, "Dissimilar Metal Corrosion" or "Galvanic Corrosion".  So I always use a penetrating oil before removing, then a tap and die to clean the threads, then anti-seize.  Takes longer but well worth it.
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      old4x4

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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #36 on: Aug 26, 2015, 12:07:12 am »
      Don't forget when using anti-seize, reduce your torque # by 25%.  Too easy to over torque an oily bolt (and I love the stuff..use it all the time)
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      RangerRick

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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #37 on: Aug 26, 2015, 07:31:50 am »
      Don't forget when using anti-seize, reduce your torque # by 25%.  Too easy to over torque an oily bolt (and I love the stuff..use it all the time)

       :agree: Thanks for the reminder. Yep, torque specs are dry threads for the most part.
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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #38 on: Aug 26, 2015, 09:20:26 am »
      Good advice
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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #39 on: Aug 26, 2015, 11:11:27 am »
      Very good advice, I did not know that...  ;)

      Bluezuke860

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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #40 on: Oct 27, 2015, 09:36:26 am »
      This is from painful experince. I always use anti-seize on any bolt or sparkplug that threads into aluminum, it keeps the threads from galling.


      USE TIME-SERTS- Better option but a bit more expensive.

      cadezracer

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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #41 on: Apr 22, 2017, 06:44:58 pm »
      I used PB Blaster for years as a HVAC tech. Then I came across KROIL, it works even better than PB. I buy it on line in a squeeze can instead of the aerosol can. It only takes a few drops, wait about 5 minutes, and out comes the bolt. 

      RangerRick

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      Re: Threads on Nuts/Bolts/Spark plugs
      « Reply #42 on: Apr 22, 2017, 07:02:44 pm »
      I used PB Blaster for years as a HVAC tech. Then I came across KROIL, it works even better than PB. I buy it on line in a squeeze can instead of the aerosol can. It only takes a few drops, wait about 5 minutes, and out comes the bolt.

      Never heard of it, but am going to try it ;) Thanks for the Information :)
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